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Title: Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Site : Five-Year Habitat Management Plan, 2001-2005, 2000-2001 Progress Report.

Abstract

Historically the lower Columbia and Willamette River Basins were ecologically rich in both the habitat types and the species diversity they supported. This was due in part to the pattern of floods and periodic inundation of bottomlands that occurred, which was an important factor in creating and maintaining a complex system of wetland, meadow, and riparian habitats. This landscape has been greatly altered in the past 150 years, primarily due to human development and agricultural activities including cattle grazing, logging and the building of hydroelectric facilities for hydropower, navigation, flood control and irrigation in the Columbia and Willamette River Basins. The Burlington Bottoms (BB) wetlands contains some of the last remaining bottomlands in the area, supporting a diverse array of native plant and wildlife species. Located approximately twelve miles northwest of Portland and situated between the Tualatin Mountains to the west and Multnomah Channel and Sauvie Island to the east, the current habitats are remnant of what was once common throughout the region. In order to preserve and enhance this important site, a five-year habitat management plan has been written that proposes a set of actions that will carry out the goals and objectives developed for the site, which includesmore » protecting, maintaining and enhancing wildlife habitat for perpetuity.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife
Sponsoring Org.:
United States. Bonneville Power Administration.
OSTI Identifier:
812191
Report Number(s):
DOE/BP-00004888-1
R&D Project: 199107800; TRN: US0303329
DOE Contract Number:  
00004888
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1 Sep 2001
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
13 HYDRO ENERGY; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CATTLE; FLOOD CONTROL; HABITAT; IRRIGATION; RESOURCE MANAGEMENT; MITIGATION; MOUNTAINS; NAVIGATION; RIVERS; SPECIES DIVERSITY; WETLANDS; WILD ANIMALS; HYDROELECTRIC POWER PLANTS; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS; WETLAND CONSERVATION - OREGON - MULTNOMAH COUNTY; WILDLIFE HABITAT IMPROVEMENT - OREGON MULTNOMAH COUNTY; FISH HABITAT IMPROVEMENT - COLUMBIA RIVER WATERSHED.

Citation Formats

Beilke, Susan G. Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Site : Five-Year Habitat Management Plan, 2001-2005, 2000-2001 Progress Report.. United States: N. p., 2001. Web. doi:10.2172/812191.
Beilke, Susan G. Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Site : Five-Year Habitat Management Plan, 2001-2005, 2000-2001 Progress Report.. United States. doi:10.2172/812191.
Beilke, Susan G. Sat . "Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Site : Five-Year Habitat Management Plan, 2001-2005, 2000-2001 Progress Report.". United States. doi:10.2172/812191. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/812191.
@article{osti_812191,
title = {Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Site : Five-Year Habitat Management Plan, 2001-2005, 2000-2001 Progress Report.},
author = {Beilke, Susan G},
abstractNote = {Historically the lower Columbia and Willamette River Basins were ecologically rich in both the habitat types and the species diversity they supported. This was due in part to the pattern of floods and periodic inundation of bottomlands that occurred, which was an important factor in creating and maintaining a complex system of wetland, meadow, and riparian habitats. This landscape has been greatly altered in the past 150 years, primarily due to human development and agricultural activities including cattle grazing, logging and the building of hydroelectric facilities for hydropower, navigation, flood control and irrigation in the Columbia and Willamette River Basins. The Burlington Bottoms (BB) wetlands contains some of the last remaining bottomlands in the area, supporting a diverse array of native plant and wildlife species. Located approximately twelve miles northwest of Portland and situated between the Tualatin Mountains to the west and Multnomah Channel and Sauvie Island to the east, the current habitats are remnant of what was once common throughout the region. In order to preserve and enhance this important site, a five-year habitat management plan has been written that proposes a set of actions that will carry out the goals and objectives developed for the site, which includes protecting, maintaining and enhancing wildlife habitat for perpetuity.},
doi = {10.2172/812191},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2001},
month = {9}
}

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