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Title: Packaging and Disposal of a Radium-beryllium Source using Depleted Uranium Polyethylene Composite Shielding

Abstract

Two, 111-GBq (3 Curie) radium-beryllium (RaBe) sources were in underground storage at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) since 1988. These sources originated from the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) where they were used to calibrate neutron detection diagnostics. In 1999, PPPL and BNL began a collaborative effort to expand the use of an innovative pilot-scale technology and bring it to full-scale deployment to shield these sources for eventual transport and burial at the Hanford Burial site. The transport/disposal container was constructed of depleted uranium oxide encapsulated in polyethylene to provide suitable shielding for both gamma and neutron radiation. This new material can be produced from recycled waste products (depleted uranium and polyethylene), is inexpensive, and can be disposed with the waste, unlike conventional lead containers, thus reducing exposure time for workers. This paper will provide calculations and information that led to the initial design of the shielding. We will also describe the production-scale processing of the container, cost, schedule, logistics, and many unforeseen challenges that eventually resulted in the successful fabrication and deployment of this shield. We will conclude with a description of the final configuration of the shielding container and shipping package along with recommendations for future shielding designs.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
811967
Report Number(s):
PPPL-3782
TRN: US0303289
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-76CH03073
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 11 Feb 2003
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; 70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; CONTAINERS; DEPLETED URANIUM; FABRICATION; NEUTRON DETECTION; OXIDES; PACKAGING; PHYSICS; POLYETHYLENES; SHIELDING; TRANSPORT; UNDERGROUND STORAGE; URANIUM; RADIATION PROTECTION; RADIATION, REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS; RADIOACTIVE WASTES

Citation Formats

Keith Rule, Paul Kalb, and Pete Kwaschyn. Packaging and Disposal of a Radium-beryllium Source using Depleted Uranium Polyethylene Composite Shielding. United States: N. p., 2003. Web. doi:10.2172/811967.
Keith Rule, Paul Kalb, & Pete Kwaschyn. Packaging and Disposal of a Radium-beryllium Source using Depleted Uranium Polyethylene Composite Shielding. United States. doi:10.2172/811967.
Keith Rule, Paul Kalb, and Pete Kwaschyn. Tue . "Packaging and Disposal of a Radium-beryllium Source using Depleted Uranium Polyethylene Composite Shielding". United States. doi:10.2172/811967. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/811967.
@article{osti_811967,
title = {Packaging and Disposal of a Radium-beryllium Source using Depleted Uranium Polyethylene Composite Shielding},
author = {Keith Rule and Paul Kalb and Pete Kwaschyn},
abstractNote = {Two, 111-GBq (3 Curie) radium-beryllium (RaBe) sources were in underground storage at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) since 1988. These sources originated from the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) where they were used to calibrate neutron detection diagnostics. In 1999, PPPL and BNL began a collaborative effort to expand the use of an innovative pilot-scale technology and bring it to full-scale deployment to shield these sources for eventual transport and burial at the Hanford Burial site. The transport/disposal container was constructed of depleted uranium oxide encapsulated in polyethylene to provide suitable shielding for both gamma and neutron radiation. This new material can be produced from recycled waste products (depleted uranium and polyethylene), is inexpensive, and can be disposed with the waste, unlike conventional lead containers, thus reducing exposure time for workers. This paper will provide calculations and information that led to the initial design of the shielding. We will also describe the production-scale processing of the container, cost, schedule, logistics, and many unforeseen challenges that eventually resulted in the successful fabrication and deployment of this shield. We will conclude with a description of the final configuration of the shielding container and shipping package along with recommendations for future shielding designs.},
doi = {10.2172/811967},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2003},
month = {2}
}