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Title: Defining the Effectiveness of UV Lamps Installed in Circulating Air Ductwork

Abstract

Germicidal ultraviolet (UVGI) lamps have a long history of use for inactivating microbial aerosols. Most reports have focused on the control of infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis (TB), in the occupied spaces of medical facilities. Ventilation duct use of UVGI has been increasing. In-duct applications are generally more concerned with controlling environmental organisms than with controlling infections agents. This document reports the results of a project to investigate the ability of UVGI lamps to inactivate representative environmental microbial aerosols in ventilation ducts. During this research, UVGI lamps were experimentally demonstrated to inactivate bioaerosols composed of vegetative bacteria, bacteria spores, or fungal spores to a reproducible degree under conditions of fixed dose. Vegetative bacteria were most susceptible to UVGI, with bacteria and fungal spores being substantially more resistant. The performance equation commonly cited in the literature for UVGI inactivation was found to generally apply, provided its parameters were known. Revision of final report DOE/OR22674/610-40030-01. Revised table 5 on page 33.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology Institute (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
810964
Report Number(s):
DOE/OR22674/610-40030-01R
ARTI-21CR/610-40030-01R; TRN: US200310%%101
DOE Contract Number:
FC05-99OR22674
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 30 Nov 2002
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; AIR; INFECTIOUS DISEASES; LIGHT BULBS; BACILLUS; ASPERGILLUS; IRRADIATION; ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION; BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; ULTRAVIOLET; UV; UVC; UVGI; HVAC; DUCTWORK; MOLD; FUNGUS; EFFECTIVENESS; MICROBIAL; DOSE; IRRADIANCE; REFLECTANCE; BACILLIA; ASPERGILLIS; ARTI; 21CR

Citation Formats

Douglas VanOsdell, and Karin Foarde. Defining the Effectiveness of UV Lamps Installed in Circulating Air Ductwork. United States: N. p., 2002. Web. doi:10.2172/810964.
Douglas VanOsdell, & Karin Foarde. Defining the Effectiveness of UV Lamps Installed in Circulating Air Ductwork. United States. doi:10.2172/810964.
Douglas VanOsdell, and Karin Foarde. Sat . "Defining the Effectiveness of UV Lamps Installed in Circulating Air Ductwork". United States. doi:10.2172/810964. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/810964.
@article{osti_810964,
title = {Defining the Effectiveness of UV Lamps Installed in Circulating Air Ductwork},
author = {Douglas VanOsdell and Karin Foarde},
abstractNote = {Germicidal ultraviolet (UVGI) lamps have a long history of use for inactivating microbial aerosols. Most reports have focused on the control of infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis (TB), in the occupied spaces of medical facilities. Ventilation duct use of UVGI has been increasing. In-duct applications are generally more concerned with controlling environmental organisms than with controlling infections agents. This document reports the results of a project to investigate the ability of UVGI lamps to inactivate representative environmental microbial aerosols in ventilation ducts. During this research, UVGI lamps were experimentally demonstrated to inactivate bioaerosols composed of vegetative bacteria, bacteria spores, or fungal spores to a reproducible degree under conditions of fixed dose. Vegetative bacteria were most susceptible to UVGI, with bacteria and fungal spores being substantially more resistant. The performance equation commonly cited in the literature for UVGI inactivation was found to generally apply, provided its parameters were known. Revision of final report DOE/OR22674/610-40030-01. Revised table 5 on page 33.},
doi = {10.2172/810964},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Nov 30 00:00:00 EST 2002},
month = {Sat Nov 30 00:00:00 EST 2002}
}

Technical Report:

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