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Title: Public Interaction and Educational Outreach on the Yucca Mountain Project

Abstract

In July 2002, the U.S. Congress approved Yucca Mountain in Nevada as the nation's first long-term geologic repository site for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. This major milestone for the country's high-level radioactive waste disposal program comes after more than twenty years of scientific study and intense public interaction and outreach. This paper describes public interaction and outreach challenges faced by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Yucca Mountain Project in the past and what additional communication strategies may be instituted following the July 2002 approval by the U.S. Congress to develop the site as the nation's first long-term geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The DOE public involvement activities were driven by two federal regulations--the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) of 1982, as amended. The NEPA required that DOE hold public hearings at key points in the development of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and the NWPA required the agency to conduct public hearings in the vicinity of the site prior to making a recommendation regarding the site's suitability. The NWPA also provided a roadmap for how DOE would interact with affected units of government, whichmore » include the state of Nevada and the counties surrounding the site. Because the Department anticipated and later received much public interest in this high-profile project, the agency decided to go beyond regulatory-required public involvement activities and created a broad-based program that implemented far-reaching public interaction and outreach tactics. Over the last two decades, DOE informed, educated, and engaged a myriad of interested local, national, and international parties using various traditional and innovative approaches. The Yucca Mountain Project's intensive public affairs initiatives were instrumental in involving the public, which in turn resulted in thousands of comments on various aspects of the program. These comments were considered in the development of the EIS and weighed in the Secretary of Energy's decision to recommend the site.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Yucca Mountain Project, Las Vegas, Nevada (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
808026
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 14 Nov 2002
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; 12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; COMMUNICATIONS; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENTS; HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES; NUCLEAR FUELS; NUCLEAR WASTE POLICY ACTS; RECOMMENDATIONS; US NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT; YUCCA MOUNTAIN

Citation Formats

A. Benson, and Y. Riding. Public Interaction and Educational Outreach on the Yucca Mountain Project. United States: N. p., 2002. Web. doi:10.2172/808026.
A. Benson, & Y. Riding. Public Interaction and Educational Outreach on the Yucca Mountain Project. United States. doi:10.2172/808026.
A. Benson, and Y. Riding. Thu . "Public Interaction and Educational Outreach on the Yucca Mountain Project". United States. doi:10.2172/808026. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/808026.
@article{osti_808026,
title = {Public Interaction and Educational Outreach on the Yucca Mountain Project},
author = {A. Benson and Y. Riding},
abstractNote = {In July 2002, the U.S. Congress approved Yucca Mountain in Nevada as the nation's first long-term geologic repository site for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. This major milestone for the country's high-level radioactive waste disposal program comes after more than twenty years of scientific study and intense public interaction and outreach. This paper describes public interaction and outreach challenges faced by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Yucca Mountain Project in the past and what additional communication strategies may be instituted following the July 2002 approval by the U.S. Congress to develop the site as the nation's first long-term geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The DOE public involvement activities were driven by two federal regulations--the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) of 1982, as amended. The NEPA required that DOE hold public hearings at key points in the development of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and the NWPA required the agency to conduct public hearings in the vicinity of the site prior to making a recommendation regarding the site's suitability. The NWPA also provided a roadmap for how DOE would interact with affected units of government, which include the state of Nevada and the counties surrounding the site. Because the Department anticipated and later received much public interest in this high-profile project, the agency decided to go beyond regulatory-required public involvement activities and created a broad-based program that implemented far-reaching public interaction and outreach tactics. Over the last two decades, DOE informed, educated, and engaged a myriad of interested local, national, and international parties using various traditional and innovative approaches. The Yucca Mountain Project's intensive public affairs initiatives were instrumental in involving the public, which in turn resulted in thousands of comments on various aspects of the program. These comments were considered in the development of the EIS and weighed in the Secretary of Energy's decision to recommend the site.},
doi = {10.2172/808026},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Nov 14 00:00:00 EST 2002},
month = {Thu Nov 14 00:00:00 EST 2002}
}

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