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Title: Relief valve testing study

Abstract

Reclosing pressure-actuated valves, commonly called relief valves, are designed to relieve system pressure once it reaches the set point of the valve. They generally operate either proportional to the differential between their set pressure and the system pressure (gradual lift) or by rapidly opening fully when the set pressure is reached (pop action). A pop action valve allows the maximum fluid flow through the valve when the set pressure is reached. A gradual lift valve allows fluid flow in proportion to how much the system pressure has exceeded the set pressure of the valve (in the case of pressure relief) or has decreased below the set pressure (vacuum relief). These valves are used to protect systems from over and under pressurization. They are used on boilers, pressure vessels, piping systems and vacuum systems to prevent catastrophic failures of these systems, which can happen if they are under or over pressurized beyond the material tolerances. The construction of these valves ranges from extreme precision of less than a psi tolerance and a very short lifetime to extremely robust construction such as those used on historic railroad steam engines that are designed operate many times a day without changing their set pressuremore » when the engines are operating. Relief valves can be designed to be immune to the effects of back pressure or to be vulnerable to it. Which type of valve to use depends upon the design requirements of the system.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
FH (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
807511
Report Number(s):
HNF-8390, Rev.0
EDT-627047; TRN: US0301859
DOE Contract Number:  
AC06-96RL13200
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 26 Nov 2001
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; DESIGN; FLUID FLOW; RELIEF VALVES; OPERATION; USES; HANFORD RESERVATION; RELIEF VALVE; TEST; STUDY; GRADUAL LIFT; POP ACTION; PRESSURE RELIEF; VACUUM RELIEF

Citation Formats

BROMM, R D. Relief valve testing study. United States: N. p., 2001. Web. doi:10.2172/807511.
BROMM, R D. Relief valve testing study. United States. doi:10.2172/807511.
BROMM, R D. Mon . "Relief valve testing study". United States. doi:10.2172/807511. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/807511.
@article{osti_807511,
title = {Relief valve testing study},
author = {BROMM, R D},
abstractNote = {Reclosing pressure-actuated valves, commonly called relief valves, are designed to relieve system pressure once it reaches the set point of the valve. They generally operate either proportional to the differential between their set pressure and the system pressure (gradual lift) or by rapidly opening fully when the set pressure is reached (pop action). A pop action valve allows the maximum fluid flow through the valve when the set pressure is reached. A gradual lift valve allows fluid flow in proportion to how much the system pressure has exceeded the set pressure of the valve (in the case of pressure relief) or has decreased below the set pressure (vacuum relief). These valves are used to protect systems from over and under pressurization. They are used on boilers, pressure vessels, piping systems and vacuum systems to prevent catastrophic failures of these systems, which can happen if they are under or over pressurized beyond the material tolerances. The construction of these valves ranges from extreme precision of less than a psi tolerance and a very short lifetime to extremely robust construction such as those used on historic railroad steam engines that are designed operate many times a day without changing their set pressure when the engines are operating. Relief valves can be designed to be immune to the effects of back pressure or to be vulnerable to it. Which type of valve to use depends upon the design requirements of the system.},
doi = {10.2172/807511},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2001},
month = {11}
}

Technical Report:

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