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Title: Statistical Analysis of Dosimetry Data for Dose Planning & Reduction

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
FH (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
807100
Report Number(s):
HNF-8235-FP, Rev.0
TRN: US0301713
DOE Contract Number:
AC06-96RL13200
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Conference title not supplied, Conference location not supplied, Conference dates not supplied; Other Information: PBD: 18 May 2001
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; DOSIMETRY; PLANNING; STATISTICS; RADIATION PROTECTION

Citation Formats

PREVETTE, S.S.. Statistical Analysis of Dosimetry Data for Dose Planning & Reduction. United States: N. p., 2001. Web.
PREVETTE, S.S.. Statistical Analysis of Dosimetry Data for Dose Planning & Reduction. United States.
PREVETTE, S.S.. Fri . "Statistical Analysis of Dosimetry Data for Dose Planning & Reduction". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/807100.
@article{osti_807100,
title = {Statistical Analysis of Dosimetry Data for Dose Planning & Reduction},
author = {PREVETTE, S.S.},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri May 18 00:00:00 EDT 2001},
month = {Fri May 18 00:00:00 EDT 2001}
}

Conference:
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  • Treatment planning for clinical trials with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is complicated substantially by the fact that the radiation field generated by the activating external neutron beam is composed of several different types of radiation, i.e., fast neutrons, recoil protons from elastic collisions with hydrogen, gamma rays from the reactor and from neutron capture by body hydrogen, protons from nitrogen capture, and the products of the NCT interaction. Furthermore, the relative contribution of each type of radiation varies with depth in tissue. Because each of these radiations has its own RBE, and the RBE of the fast neutron componentmore » will not be constant as the neutron spectrum changes with depth, the problem of predicting the severity of the biological effect, in depth, becomes complex indeed. In order to attack this problem, Monte Carlo calculations of dose, checked against benchmark measurements, are employed. Two approaches are then used to assess the severity of the effect. In the first, the effective dose (D[sub EF]) is determined by summing the products of (D[center dot]RBE) for each radiation. The other approach involves placing cells at the location for which the D[sub EF] was calculated. Using a dose-response curvefrom a low-LET radiation, e.g. [sup 137]Cs gamma rays (D[sub [gamma]Ca]), the photon equivalent dose (PED, or D[sub P]) can be determined. If the RBE values used are correct, the D[sub EF] and the D[sub P] should be essentially identical.« less
  • Treatment planning for clinical trials with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is complicated substantially by the fact that the radiation field generated by the activating external neutron beam is composed of several different types of radiation, i.e., fast neutrons, recoil protons from elastic collisions with hydrogen, gamma rays from the reactor and from neutron capture by body hydrogen, protons from nitrogen capture, and the products of the NCT interaction. Furthermore, the relative contribution of each type of radiation varies with depth in tissue. Because each of these radiations has its own RBE, and the RBE of the fast neutron componentmore » will not be constant as the neutron spectrum changes with depth, the problem of predicting the severity of the biological effect, in depth, becomes complex indeed. In order to attack this problem, Monte Carlo calculations of dose, checked against benchmark measurements, are employed. Two approaches are then used to assess the severity of the effect. In the first, the effective dose (D{sub EF}) is determined by summing the products of (D{center_dot}RBE) for each radiation. The other approach involves placing cells at the location for which the D{sub EF} was calculated. Using a dose-response curvefrom a low-LET radiation, e.g. {sup 137}Cs gamma rays (D{sub {gamma}Ca}), the photon equivalent dose (PED, or D{sub P}) can be determined. If the RBE values used are correct, the D{sub EF} and the D{sub P} should be essentially identical.« less
  • Novel applications of gamma ray spectroscopy for D&D process development, inventory reduction, safety analysis and facility management are discussed in this paper. These applications of gamma spectroscopy were developed and implemented during the Risk Reduction Program (RPP) to successfully downgrade the Heavy Element Facility (B251) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) from a Category II Nuclear Facility to a Radiological Facility. Non-destructive assay in general, gamma spectroscopy in particular, were found to be important tools in project management, work planning, and work control (''Expect the unexpected and confirm the expected''), minimizing worker dose, and resulted in significant safety improvements andmore » operational efficiencies. Inventory reduction activities utilized gamma spectroscopy to identify and confirm isotopics of legacy inventory, ingrowth of daughter products and the presence of process impurities; quantify inventory; prioritize work activities for project management; and to supply information to satisfy shipper/receiver documentation requirements. D&D activities utilize in-situ gamma spectroscopy to identify and confirm isotopics of legacy contamination; quantify contamination levels and monitor the progress of decontamination efforts; and determine the point of diminishing returns in decontaminating enclosures and glove boxes containing high specific activity isotopes such as {sup 244}Cm and {sup 238}Pu. In-situ gamma spectroscopy provided quantitative comparisons of several decontamination techniques (e.g. TLC-free Stripcoat{trademark}, Radiac{trademark} wash, acid wash, scrubbing) and was used as a part of an iterative process to determine the appropriate level of decontamination and optimal cost to benefit ratio. Facility management followed a formal, rigorous process utilizing an independent, state certified, peer-reviewed gamma spectroscopy program, in conjunction with other characterization techniques, process knowledge, and historical records, to provide information for work planning, work prioritization, work control, and safety analyses (e.g. development of hold points, stop work points); and resulted in B251 successfully achieving Radiological status on schedule. Gamma spectroscopy helped to define operational approaches to achieve radiation exposure ALARA, e.g. hold points, appropriate engineering controls, PPE, workstations, and time/distance/shielding in the development of ALARA plans. These applications of gamma spectroscopy can be used to improve similar activities at other facilities.« less
  • Purpose: The study aimed to analyze the dose–volume profiles of 3-dimensional radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and intensity modulated RT (IMRT) in the treatment of prostate carcinoma and to specify the profiles responsible for the development of gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Methods and Materials: In the period 1997 to 2007, 483 patients with prostate carcinoma in stage T1-3 N0 (pN0) M0 were treated with definitive RT. Two groups of patients were defined for the analysis: the 3D-CRT group (n=305 patients) and the IMRT group (n=178 patients). In the entire cohort of 483 patients, the median follow-up time reached 4.4 years (range, 2.0-11.7 years).more » The cumulative absolute and relative volumes of irradiated rectum exposed to a given dose (area under the dose–volume curve, AUC) were estimated. The receiver operating characteristic analysis was then used to search for the optimal dose and volume cutoff points with the potential to distinguish patients with enhanced or escalated toxicity. Results: Despite the application of high doses (78-82 Gy) in the IMRT group, GI toxicity was lower in that group than in the group treated by 3D-CRT with prescribed doses of 70 to 74 Gy. Both RT methods showed specific rectal dose–volume distribution curves. The total AUC values for IMRT were significantly lower than those for 3D-CRT. Furthermore, IMRT significantly decreased the rectal volume receiving low to intermediate radiation doses in comparison with 3D-CRT; specific cutoff limits predictable for the level of GI toxicity are presented and defined in our work. Conclusions: Total area under the dose–volume profiles and specific cutoff points in low and intermediate dose levels have significant predictive potential toward the RT GI toxicity. In treatment planning, it seems that it is valuable to take into consideration the entire dose–volume primary distribution.« less