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Title: Waste Package and Material Testing for the Proposed Yucca Mountain High Level Waste Repository

Abstract

Over the repository lifetime, the waste package containment barriers will perform various functions that will change with time. During the operational period, the barriers will function as vessels for handling, emplacement, and waste retrieval (if necessary). During the years following repository closure, the containment barriers will be relied upon to provide substantially complete containment, through 10,000 years and beyond. Following the substantially complete containment phase, the barriers and the waste package internal structures help minimize release of radionuclides by aqueous- and gaseous-phase transport. These requirements have lead to a defense-in-depth design philosophy. A multi-barrier design will result in a lower breach rate distributed over a longer period of time, thereby ensuring the regulatory requirements are met. The design of the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) has evolved. The initial waste package design was a thin walled package, 3/8 inch of stainless steel 304, that had very limited capacity, (3 PWR and 4 BWR assemblies) and performance characteristics, 300 to 1,000 years. This design required over 35,000 waste packages compared to today's design of just over 10,000 waste packages. The waste package designs are now based on a defense-in-depth/multi-barrier philosophy and have a capacity similar to the standard storage and rail transportedmore » spent nuclear fuel casks. Concurrent with the development of the design of the waste packages, a comprehensive waste package materials testing program has been undertaken to support the selection of containment barrier materials and to develop predictive models for the long-term behavior of these materials under expected repository conditions. The testing program includes both long-term and short-term tests and the results from these tests combination with the data published in the open literature are being used to develop models for predicting performance of the waste packages.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Yucca Mountain Project, Las Vegas, Nevada (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
805694
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1 Jan 2002
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CAPACITY; CASKS; CONTAINMENT; LIFETIME; MATERIALS TESTING; NUCLEAR FUELS; POSITIONING; RADIOISOTOPES; STAINLESS STEEL-304; STORAGE; TESTING; TRANSPORT; WASTE RETRIEVAL; WASTES; YUCCA MOUNTAIN

Citation Formats

Doering, Thomas, and Pasupathi, V. Waste Package and Material Testing for the Proposed Yucca Mountain High Level Waste Repository. United States: N. p., 2002. Web. doi:10.2172/805694.
Doering, Thomas, & Pasupathi, V. Waste Package and Material Testing for the Proposed Yucca Mountain High Level Waste Repository. United States. doi:10.2172/805694.
Doering, Thomas, and Pasupathi, V. Tue . "Waste Package and Material Testing for the Proposed Yucca Mountain High Level Waste Repository". United States. doi:10.2172/805694. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/805694.
@article{osti_805694,
title = {Waste Package and Material Testing for the Proposed Yucca Mountain High Level Waste Repository},
author = {Doering, Thomas and Pasupathi, V},
abstractNote = {Over the repository lifetime, the waste package containment barriers will perform various functions that will change with time. During the operational period, the barriers will function as vessels for handling, emplacement, and waste retrieval (if necessary). During the years following repository closure, the containment barriers will be relied upon to provide substantially complete containment, through 10,000 years and beyond. Following the substantially complete containment phase, the barriers and the waste package internal structures help minimize release of radionuclides by aqueous- and gaseous-phase transport. These requirements have lead to a defense-in-depth design philosophy. A multi-barrier design will result in a lower breach rate distributed over a longer period of time, thereby ensuring the regulatory requirements are met. The design of the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) has evolved. The initial waste package design was a thin walled package, 3/8 inch of stainless steel 304, that had very limited capacity, (3 PWR and 4 BWR assemblies) and performance characteristics, 300 to 1,000 years. This design required over 35,000 waste packages compared to today's design of just over 10,000 waste packages. The waste package designs are now based on a defense-in-depth/multi-barrier philosophy and have a capacity similar to the standard storage and rail transported spent nuclear fuel casks. Concurrent with the development of the design of the waste packages, a comprehensive waste package materials testing program has been undertaken to support the selection of containment barrier materials and to develop predictive models for the long-term behavior of these materials under expected repository conditions. The testing program includes both long-term and short-term tests and the results from these tests combination with the data published in the open literature are being used to develop models for predicting performance of the waste packages.},
doi = {10.2172/805694},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2002},
month = {1}
}