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Title: Pore Connectivity Effects on Solute Transport in Rocks

Abstract

Retardation of nuclear contaminants in rock matrices can lead to long retention times, allowing substantial radionuclide decay prior to eventual release. Imbibition and diffusion into the rock matrix can move contaminants away from an active fracture, thereby contributing to their retardation. However, diffusive transport in some rocks may behave anomalously because of their sparsely connected porespace, in contrast to diffusion in rocks with denser pore connections. We examined imbibition of weakly sorbing tracers into welded tuff and Indiana sandstone, and water imbibition into metagraywacke and Berea sandstone. Tuff samples were initially equilibrated to 12% and 76% water (v/v) within controlled humidity chambers, while the other rocks were air-dried. For imbibition, one face was exposed to water, with or without tracer, and uptake was measured over time. Following imbibition, tracer concentration measurements were made at fine (1 mm) increments. Three anomalous results were observed: (1) Indiana sandstone and metagraywacke showed mass of imbibed water scaling as time{sup 0.26}, while tuff and Berea sandstone showed the more classical scaling with time{sup 0.05}; (2) tracer movement into dry (2% initial saturation) Indiana sandstone showed a dispersion pattern similar to that expected during tracer movement into moist (76% initial saturation) tuft and (3) tracermore » concentrations at the inlet face of the tuff sample were approximately twice those deeper inside the sample. The experiment was then modeled using random walk methods on a 3-D lattice with different values of pore coordination. Network model simulations that used a pore coordination of 1.49 for Indiana sandstone and 1.56 for metagraywacke showed similar temporal scaling, a result of their porespace being close to the percolation threshold. Tracer concentration profiles in Indiana sandstone and tuff were closely matched by simulations that used pore coordinations of 1.49 and 1.68, respectively, because of how low connectivity alters the accessible porosity in the vicinity of the inlet face. The study supports pore connectivity as a coherent explanation for the observed anomalies and demonstrates the utility of pore-scale modeling in elucidating mechanisms critical to radionuclide retardation in geological repositories.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Yucca Mountain Project, Las Vegas, Nevada (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
805593
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 5 Dec 2001
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; 12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; DIFFUSION; POROSITY; RADIOISOTOPES; SANDSTONES; SATURATION; SOLUTES; ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT; TUFF; RADIONUCLIDE MIGRATION; RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL

Citation Formats

Oinhong Hu. Pore Connectivity Effects on Solute Transport in Rocks. United States: N. p., 2001. Web. doi:10.2172/805593.
Oinhong Hu. Pore Connectivity Effects on Solute Transport in Rocks. United States. doi:10.2172/805593.
Oinhong Hu. Wed . "Pore Connectivity Effects on Solute Transport in Rocks". United States. doi:10.2172/805593. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/805593.
@article{osti_805593,
title = {Pore Connectivity Effects on Solute Transport in Rocks},
author = {Oinhong Hu},
abstractNote = {Retardation of nuclear contaminants in rock matrices can lead to long retention times, allowing substantial radionuclide decay prior to eventual release. Imbibition and diffusion into the rock matrix can move contaminants away from an active fracture, thereby contributing to their retardation. However, diffusive transport in some rocks may behave anomalously because of their sparsely connected porespace, in contrast to diffusion in rocks with denser pore connections. We examined imbibition of weakly sorbing tracers into welded tuff and Indiana sandstone, and water imbibition into metagraywacke and Berea sandstone. Tuff samples were initially equilibrated to 12% and 76% water (v/v) within controlled humidity chambers, while the other rocks were air-dried. For imbibition, one face was exposed to water, with or without tracer, and uptake was measured over time. Following imbibition, tracer concentration measurements were made at fine (1 mm) increments. Three anomalous results were observed: (1) Indiana sandstone and metagraywacke showed mass of imbibed water scaling as time{sup 0.26}, while tuff and Berea sandstone showed the more classical scaling with time{sup 0.05}; (2) tracer movement into dry (2% initial saturation) Indiana sandstone showed a dispersion pattern similar to that expected during tracer movement into moist (76% initial saturation) tuft and (3) tracer concentrations at the inlet face of the tuff sample were approximately twice those deeper inside the sample. The experiment was then modeled using random walk methods on a 3-D lattice with different values of pore coordination. Network model simulations that used a pore coordination of 1.49 for Indiana sandstone and 1.56 for metagraywacke showed similar temporal scaling, a result of their porespace being close to the percolation threshold. Tracer concentration profiles in Indiana sandstone and tuff were closely matched by simulations that used pore coordinations of 1.49 and 1.68, respectively, because of how low connectivity alters the accessible porosity in the vicinity of the inlet face. The study supports pore connectivity as a coherent explanation for the observed anomalies and demonstrates the utility of pore-scale modeling in elucidating mechanisms critical to radionuclide retardation in geological repositories.},
doi = {10.2172/805593},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2001},
month = {12}
}