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Title: Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2000 Annual Report.

Abstract

The year 2000 hydrosystem operations illustrated two main points: (1) that the NMFS Biological Opinion on the operations of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) fish migration measures could not be met in a slightly below average water year, and; (2) the impacts and relationships of energy deregulation and volatile wholesale energy prices on the ability of the FCRPS to provide the Biological Opinion fish migration measures. In 2000, a slightly below average water year, the flow targets were not met and, when energy ''emergencies'' were declared, salmon protection measures were reduced. The 2000 migration year was a below average runoff volume year with an actual run off volume of 61.1 MAF or 96% of average. This year illustrated the ability of the hydro system to meet the migration protection measures established by the NMFS Biological Opinion. The winter operation of storage reservoirs was based upon inaccurate runoff volume forecasts which predicted a January-July runoff volume forecast at The Dalles of 102 to 105% of average, from January through June. Reservoir flood control drafts during the winter months occurred according to these forecasts. This caused an over-draft of reservoirs that resulted in less volume of water available for fishmore » flow augmentation in the spring and the summer. The season Biological Opinion flow targets for spring and summer migrants at Lower Granite and McNary dams were not met. Several power emergencies were declared by BPA in the summer of 2000. The first in June was caused by loss of resources (WNP2 went off-line). The second and third emergencies were declared in August as a result of power emergencies in California and in the Northwest. The unanticipated effects of energy deregulation, power market volatility and rising wholesale electricity prices, and Californian energy deregulation reduced the ability of the FCRPS to implement fish protection measures. A Spill Plan Agreement was implemented in the FCRPS. Under this plan, spill hours were increased at Lower Monumental Dam. Spill volume at The Dalles was reduced and daytime spill tests were conducted at John Day and Bonneville Dams. Although provided for fish, most spill that occurred in 2000 was either in excess of project hydraulic capacity or excess generation. This effectively reduced the actual cost of the spill program. For the most part, spill in 2000 was managed to the waiver limits for total dissolved gas levels and the NMFS action criteria for dissolved gas signs were not exceeded. Hatchery spring chinook returns comprised an estimated 81.4% of the total spring chinook adult return to Lower Granite Dam. Smolt travel time and survival were similar to past years for most Smolt Monitoring Program groups. The notable exceptions were Snake River hatchery steelhead groups and mid-Columbia hatchery sub-yearling groups from Wells and Ringold hatcheries, which had significantly lower survival than previous years. Yearling chinook travel time showed variation from past years, reflecting the atypical flow shape in 2000 which had high flows in April, declining through May.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority
Sponsoring Org.:
United States. Bonneville Power Administration.
OSTI Identifier:
801466
Report Number(s):
DOE/BP-15377-3
R&D Project: 199403300; TRN: US200220%%960
DOE Contract Number:  
1999FG15377
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1 Jun 2001
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
13 HYDRO ENERGY; 24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; COLUMBIA RIVER; DAMS; DEREGULATION; ELECTRICITY; FLOOD CONTROL; GRANITES; HYDRAULICS; MONITORING; POWER SYSTEMS; PRICES; RIVERS; RUNOFF; SALMON; SEASONS; TARGETS; VOLATILITY; Fishways - Columbia River - Statistics

Citation Formats

DeHart, Michele. Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2000 Annual Report.. United States: N. p., 2001. Web. doi:10.2172/801466.
DeHart, Michele. Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2000 Annual Report.. United States. doi:10.2172/801466.
DeHart, Michele. Fri . "Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2000 Annual Report.". United States. doi:10.2172/801466. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/801466.
@article{osti_801466,
title = {Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2000 Annual Report.},
author = {DeHart, Michele},
abstractNote = {The year 2000 hydrosystem operations illustrated two main points: (1) that the NMFS Biological Opinion on the operations of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) fish migration measures could not be met in a slightly below average water year, and; (2) the impacts and relationships of energy deregulation and volatile wholesale energy prices on the ability of the FCRPS to provide the Biological Opinion fish migration measures. In 2000, a slightly below average water year, the flow targets were not met and, when energy ''emergencies'' were declared, salmon protection measures were reduced. The 2000 migration year was a below average runoff volume year with an actual run off volume of 61.1 MAF or 96% of average. This year illustrated the ability of the hydro system to meet the migration protection measures established by the NMFS Biological Opinion. The winter operation of storage reservoirs was based upon inaccurate runoff volume forecasts which predicted a January-July runoff volume forecast at The Dalles of 102 to 105% of average, from January through June. Reservoir flood control drafts during the winter months occurred according to these forecasts. This caused an over-draft of reservoirs that resulted in less volume of water available for fish flow augmentation in the spring and the summer. The season Biological Opinion flow targets for spring and summer migrants at Lower Granite and McNary dams were not met. Several power emergencies were declared by BPA in the summer of 2000. The first in June was caused by loss of resources (WNP2 went off-line). The second and third emergencies were declared in August as a result of power emergencies in California and in the Northwest. The unanticipated effects of energy deregulation, power market volatility and rising wholesale electricity prices, and Californian energy deregulation reduced the ability of the FCRPS to implement fish protection measures. A Spill Plan Agreement was implemented in the FCRPS. Under this plan, spill hours were increased at Lower Monumental Dam. Spill volume at The Dalles was reduced and daytime spill tests were conducted at John Day and Bonneville Dams. Although provided for fish, most spill that occurred in 2000 was either in excess of project hydraulic capacity or excess generation. This effectively reduced the actual cost of the spill program. For the most part, spill in 2000 was managed to the waiver limits for total dissolved gas levels and the NMFS action criteria for dissolved gas signs were not exceeded. Hatchery spring chinook returns comprised an estimated 81.4% of the total spring chinook adult return to Lower Granite Dam. Smolt travel time and survival were similar to past years for most Smolt Monitoring Program groups. The notable exceptions were Snake River hatchery steelhead groups and mid-Columbia hatchery sub-yearling groups from Wells and Ringold hatcheries, which had significantly lower survival than previous years. Yearling chinook travel time showed variation from past years, reflecting the atypical flow shape in 2000 which had high flows in April, declining through May.},
doi = {10.2172/801466},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2001},
month = {6}
}

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