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Title: Virus Assemblies as Templates for Nanocircuits

Abstract

Advances in nanotechnology offer significant improvements in a wide range of applications that include, light weight materials with greater strength, increased energy efficiency from electronic devices, and better sensors for a range of environmental and manufacturing uses. Furthermore, since size constraints often produce qualitative changes in the characteristics of matter, it is anticipated that the exploitation of nanotechnology will result in the identification of new phenomena and functionalities derived from the physics, chemistry, and biology of matter at the nanoscale level. However, these advances will require the development of systems for the design, modeling, and synthesis of nanoscale materials. Interestingly, many biological molecules function on this scale and possess unique properties that impart the ability to assume defined conformations and assembles, as well as interact with specific chemical or biological substrates. These traits are ideally suited for developing new models and methods for the production of novel materials at the nanoscale level. The goal of this proposal is to combine expertise in biology/protein engineering (Dr. Culver, University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute) and chemical engineering/nanophase structures (Dr. Harris, Purdue University) to develop biological macromolecules suitable for use in a variety of nanotechnologies. Specifically, this work will focus on using the well-definedmore » assembly process of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) as a model system for the production of template-dependent nanoparticles and nanowires. Plant viruses, such as TMV, produce remarkably stable virions that consist of identical protein subunits arranged to form larger macromolecules such as rods and spheres. The internal and external surfaces of these macromolecules contain repeating patterns of charged amino acids that can be used for the ordered nucleation of inorganic solids such as copper or gold. In addition, using molecular method s it is possible to alter the composition of the viral proteins to produce particles with enhanced abilities to function in the synthesis of inorganic materials.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute, Baltimore, MD (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Research (ER) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
801454
Report Number(s):
DOE/ER45975-1
DE-FG02-02ER45975; TRN: US200305%%1183
DOE Contract Number:  
FG02-02ER45975
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 25 Sep 2002
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; AMINO ACIDS; BIOLOGY; BIOTECHNOLOGY; CHEMISTRY; ENERGY EFFICIENCY; MANUFACTURING; NUCLEATION; PHYSICS; PROTEINS; SIMULATION; SUBSTRATES; SYNTHESIS; TOBACCO MOSAIC VIRUS; VIRUSES; NANOPARTICLES; BIO-TEMPLATES; VIRUS

Citation Formats

Culver, James N, and Harris, Michael T. Virus Assemblies as Templates for Nanocircuits. United States: N. p., 2002. Web. doi:10.2172/801454.
Culver, James N, & Harris, Michael T. Virus Assemblies as Templates for Nanocircuits. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/801454
Culver, James N, and Harris, Michael T. Wed . "Virus Assemblies as Templates for Nanocircuits". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/801454. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/801454.
@article{osti_801454,
title = {Virus Assemblies as Templates for Nanocircuits},
author = {Culver, James N and Harris, Michael T},
abstractNote = {Advances in nanotechnology offer significant improvements in a wide range of applications that include, light weight materials with greater strength, increased energy efficiency from electronic devices, and better sensors for a range of environmental and manufacturing uses. Furthermore, since size constraints often produce qualitative changes in the characteristics of matter, it is anticipated that the exploitation of nanotechnology will result in the identification of new phenomena and functionalities derived from the physics, chemistry, and biology of matter at the nanoscale level. However, these advances will require the development of systems for the design, modeling, and synthesis of nanoscale materials. Interestingly, many biological molecules function on this scale and possess unique properties that impart the ability to assume defined conformations and assembles, as well as interact with specific chemical or biological substrates. These traits are ideally suited for developing new models and methods for the production of novel materials at the nanoscale level. The goal of this proposal is to combine expertise in biology/protein engineering (Dr. Culver, University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute) and chemical engineering/nanophase structures (Dr. Harris, Purdue University) to develop biological macromolecules suitable for use in a variety of nanotechnologies. Specifically, this work will focus on using the well-defined assembly process of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) as a model system for the production of template-dependent nanoparticles and nanowires. Plant viruses, such as TMV, produce remarkably stable virions that consist of identical protein subunits arranged to form larger macromolecules such as rods and spheres. The internal and external surfaces of these macromolecules contain repeating patterns of charged amino acids that can be used for the ordered nucleation of inorganic solids such as copper or gold. In addition, using molecular method s it is possible to alter the composition of the viral proteins to produce particles with enhanced abilities to function in the synthesis of inorganic materials.},
doi = {10.2172/801454},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/801454}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2002},
month = {9}
}