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Title: Uranium Measurement Improvements at the Savannah River Technology Center

Abstract

Uranium isotope ratio and isotope dilution methods by mass spectrometry are used to achieve sensitivity, precision and accuracy for various applications. This report presents recent progress made at SRTC in the analysis of minor isotopes of uranium. Comparison of routine measurements of NBL certified uranium (U005a) using the SRTC Three Stage Mass Spectrometer (3SMS) and the SRTC Single Stage Mass Spectrometer (SSMS). As expected, the three stage mass spectrometer yielded superior sensitivity, precision, and accuracy for this application.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Savannah River Site (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
799322
Report Number(s):
WSRC-MS-2002-00087
TRN: US0300018
DOE Contract Number:
AC09-96SR18500
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: American Nuclear Society 2002 Annual Meeting, Hollywood, FL (US), 06/09/2002--06/13/2002; Other Information: PBD: 13 Feb 2002
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
38 RADIATION CHEMISTRY, RADIOCHEMISTRY, AND NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY; ACCURACY; ISOTOPE DILUTION; MASS SPECTROMETERS; SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT; SENSITIVITY; URANIUM; URANIUM ISOTOPES; ISOTOPE RATIO; PERFORMANCE

Citation Formats

Shick, C. Jr.. Uranium Measurement Improvements at the Savannah River Technology Center. United States: N. p., 2002. Web.
Shick, C. Jr.. Uranium Measurement Improvements at the Savannah River Technology Center. United States.
Shick, C. Jr.. Wed . "Uranium Measurement Improvements at the Savannah River Technology Center". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/799322.
@article{osti_799322,
title = {Uranium Measurement Improvements at the Savannah River Technology Center},
author = {Shick, C. Jr.},
abstractNote = {Uranium isotope ratio and isotope dilution methods by mass spectrometry are used to achieve sensitivity, precision and accuracy for various applications. This report presents recent progress made at SRTC in the analysis of minor isotopes of uranium. Comparison of routine measurements of NBL certified uranium (U005a) using the SRTC Three Stage Mass Spectrometer (3SMS) and the SRTC Single Stage Mass Spectrometer (SSMS). As expected, the three stage mass spectrometer yielded superior sensitivity, precision, and accuracy for this application.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 13 00:00:00 EST 2002},
month = {Wed Feb 13 00:00:00 EST 2002}
}

Conference:
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  • The Savannah River Technical Center (SRTC) has been active in teaming with academic and industrial partners to advance hydrogen technology. A primary focus of SRTC's R and D has been hydrogen storage using metal and complex hydrides. SRTC and its Hydrogen Technology Laboratory (HyTech) have been very successful in leveraging their defense infrastructure, capabilities and investments to help solve this country's energy problems. Many of HyTech's programs support dual-use applications. HyTech has participated in projects to convert public transit and utility vehicles for operation on hydrogen fuel. Two major projects include the H2Fuel Bus and an Industrial Fuel Cell Vehiclemore » (IFCV) also known as the GATORTM. Both of these projects were funded by DOE and cost shared by industry.« less
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  • The iodine isotopes I-132, 1-133, I-134, and I-135, which have half-lives ranging from 53 minutes to 21 hours, are measured in the atmospheric effluent from the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. SRS is operated by Westinghouse Savannah River Company for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The isotopes' release rates range from 10 to 300 microcuries per week compared to the rate. The resulting annual dose from all iodine isotopes is minor; it comprises 0.01 percent of the total offsite dose due to atmospheric releases from SRS in 1990. Circumstantialmore » evidence indicates the radioiodine originates from traces of unencapsulated Cf-252. The determination that spontaneous fission of Cf-252 is the source of the radioiodine has several ramifications. Radioactive fission-product isotopes of the noble gas elements krypton and xenon must also be released. Noble gases are more volatile and mobile than iodine. Also, the released iodine isotopes decay to xenon isotopes. The noble gases decay to non-gaseous elements that are transported along with radioiodine to the terrestrial environment by deposition from the SRTC plume. Only Sr-89 is believed to accumulate sufficiently in the environment to approach detectable levels. Given similar conditions in earlier years, releases of short-lived radioiodine have occurred undetected in routine monitoring since the early 1970s. Release rates 20 years ago would have been 200 times greater than current release rates. This report documents preliminary experiments conducted by SRTC and Environmental Monitoring Section (EMS) scientists. The release process and the environmental impact of fission products from Cf-252 should be thoroughly researched.« less
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