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Title: AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Removal of Residual Elements in The Steel Ladle by a Combination of Top Slag and Deep Injection Practice

Abstract

The objective of this work was to determine if tin could be removed from liquid steel by a combination of deep injection of calcium and a reducing top-slag practice. The work was carried out in three stages: injection of Ca wire into 35 Kg heats in an induction furnace under laboratory condition; a fundamental study of the solubility of Sn in the slag as a function of oxygen potential, temperature and slag composition; and, two full-scale plant trials. During the first stage, it was found that 7 to 50% of the Sn was removed from initial Sn contents of 0.1%, using 8 to 16 Kg of calcium per tonne of steel. The Sn solubility study suggested that low oxygen potential, high basicity of the slag and lower temperature would aid Sn removal by deep injection of Ca in the bath. However, two full-scale trials at the LMF station in Dofasco's plant showed virtually no Sn removal, mainly because of very low Ca consumption rates used (0.5 to 1.1 Kg/tonne vs. 8 to 16 Kg/tonne used during the induction furnace study in the laboratory). Based on the current price of Ca, addition of 8 to 16 Kg/tonne of steel to removemore » Sn is too cost prohibitive, and therefore, it is not worthwhile to pursue this process further, even though it may be technically feasible.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
American Iron and Steel Institute (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
(US)
OSTI Identifier:
799244
Report Number(s):
DOE/ID/13554/9742
TRN: US200308%%431
DOE Contract Number:  
FC07-97ID13554
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 31 Aug 2001
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CALCIUM; CONSUMPTION RATES; INDUCTION FURNACES; OXYGEN POTENTIAL; PRICES; REMOVAL; SLAGS; SOLUBILITY; STEELS

Citation Formats

Street, S, Coley, K S, and Iron, G A. AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Removal of Residual Elements in The Steel Ladle by a Combination of Top Slag and Deep Injection Practice. United States: N. p., 2001. Web. doi:10.2172/799244.
Street, S, Coley, K S, & Iron, G A. AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Removal of Residual Elements in The Steel Ladle by a Combination of Top Slag and Deep Injection Practice. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/799244
Street, S, Coley, K S, and Iron, G A. 2001. "AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Removal of Residual Elements in The Steel Ladle by a Combination of Top Slag and Deep Injection Practice". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/799244. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/799244.
@article{osti_799244,
title = {AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Removal of Residual Elements in The Steel Ladle by a Combination of Top Slag and Deep Injection Practice},
author = {Street, S and Coley, K S and Iron, G A},
abstractNote = {The objective of this work was to determine if tin could be removed from liquid steel by a combination of deep injection of calcium and a reducing top-slag practice. The work was carried out in three stages: injection of Ca wire into 35 Kg heats in an induction furnace under laboratory condition; a fundamental study of the solubility of Sn in the slag as a function of oxygen potential, temperature and slag composition; and, two full-scale plant trials. During the first stage, it was found that 7 to 50% of the Sn was removed from initial Sn contents of 0.1%, using 8 to 16 Kg of calcium per tonne of steel. The Sn solubility study suggested that low oxygen potential, high basicity of the slag and lower temperature would aid Sn removal by deep injection of Ca in the bath. However, two full-scale trials at the LMF station in Dofasco's plant showed virtually no Sn removal, mainly because of very low Ca consumption rates used (0.5 to 1.1 Kg/tonne vs. 8 to 16 Kg/tonne used during the induction furnace study in the laboratory). Based on the current price of Ca, addition of 8 to 16 Kg/tonne of steel to remove Sn is too cost prohibitive, and therefore, it is not worthwhile to pursue this process further, even though it may be technically feasible.},
doi = {10.2172/799244},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/799244}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2001},
month = {8}
}