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Title: Chemical separations schemes for partitioning and transmutation systems.

Abstract

In the initial phase of the U.S. Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) program, a single-tier system was foreseen in which the transuranics and long-lived fission products (specifically, {sup 99}Tc and {sup 129}I) recovered from spent LWR oxide fuel would be sent directly to an accelerator-driven transmuter reactor [1]. Because the quantity of fuel to be processed annually was so large (almost 1,500 tons per year), an aqueous solvent extraction process was chosen for LWR fuel processing. Without the need to separate transuranics from one another for feed to the transmuter, it became appropriate to develop an advanced aqueous separations method that became known as UREX. The UREX process employs an added reagent (acetohydroxamic acid) that suppresses the extraction of plutonium and promotes the extraction of technetium together with uranium. Technetium can then be efficiently removed from the uranium; the recovered uranium, being highly decontaminated, can be disposed of as a low-level waste or stored in an unshielded facility for future use. Plutonium and the other transuranic elements, plus the remaining fission products, are directed to the liquid waste stream. This stream is calcined, converting the transuranics and fission products to their oxides. The resulting oxide powder, now representing only aboutmore » four percent of the original mass of the spent fuel, is reduced to metallic form by means of a pyrometallurgical process. Subsequently, the transuranics are separated from the fission products in another pyro-metallurgical step involving molten salt electrorefining.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab., IL (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
797913
Report Number(s):
ANL/CMT/CP-107557
TRN: US0202977
DOE Contract Number:  
W-31-109-ENG-38
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: ANS 2002 Annual Meeting, Hollywood, FL (US), 06/09/2002--06/13/2002; Other Information: PBD: 2 May 2002
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; 43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ACCELERATORS; ELECTROREFINING; FISSION PRODUCTS; LIQUID WASTES; MOLTEN SALTS; OXIDES; PLUTONIUM; SOLVENT EXTRACTION; SPENT FUELS; TECHNETIUM; TRANSMUTATION; URANIUM; WASTES

Citation Formats

Laidler, J. Chemical separations schemes for partitioning and transmutation systems.. United States: N. p., 2002. Web.
Laidler, J. Chemical separations schemes for partitioning and transmutation systems.. United States.
Laidler, J. Thu . "Chemical separations schemes for partitioning and transmutation systems.". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/797913.
@article{osti_797913,
title = {Chemical separations schemes for partitioning and transmutation systems.},
author = {Laidler, J},
abstractNote = {In the initial phase of the U.S. Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) program, a single-tier system was foreseen in which the transuranics and long-lived fission products (specifically, {sup 99}Tc and {sup 129}I) recovered from spent LWR oxide fuel would be sent directly to an accelerator-driven transmuter reactor [1]. Because the quantity of fuel to be processed annually was so large (almost 1,500 tons per year), an aqueous solvent extraction process was chosen for LWR fuel processing. Without the need to separate transuranics from one another for feed to the transmuter, it became appropriate to develop an advanced aqueous separations method that became known as UREX. The UREX process employs an added reagent (acetohydroxamic acid) that suppresses the extraction of plutonium and promotes the extraction of technetium together with uranium. Technetium can then be efficiently removed from the uranium; the recovered uranium, being highly decontaminated, can be disposed of as a low-level waste or stored in an unshielded facility for future use. Plutonium and the other transuranic elements, plus the remaining fission products, are directed to the liquid waste stream. This stream is calcined, converting the transuranics and fission products to their oxides. The resulting oxide powder, now representing only about four percent of the original mass of the spent fuel, is reduced to metallic form by means of a pyrometallurgical process. Subsequently, the transuranics are separated from the fission products in another pyro-metallurgical step involving molten salt electrorefining.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2002},
month = {5}
}

Conference:
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