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Title: The Development of Layered Photonic Band Gap Structures Using a Micro-Transfer Molding Technique

Abstract

Photonic band gap (PBG) crystals are periodic dielectric structures that manipulate electromagnetic radiation in a manner similar to semiconductor devices manipulating electrons. Whereas a semiconductor material exhibits an electronic band gap in which electrons cannot exist, similarly, a photonic crystal containing a photonic band gap does not allow the propagation of specific frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. This phenomenon results from the destructive Bragg diffraction interference that a wave propagating at a specific frequency will experience because of the periodic change in dielectric permitivity. This gives rise to a variety of optical applications for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of opto-electronic devices. These applications are reviewed later. Several methods are currently used to fabricate photonic crystals, which are also discussed in detail. This research involves a layer-by-layer micro-transfer molding ({mu}TM) and stacking method to create three-dimensional FCC structures of epoxy or titania. The structures, once reduced significantly in size can be infiltrated with an organic gain media and stacked on a semiconductor to improve the efficiency of an electronically pumped light-emitting diode. Photonic band gap structures have been proven to effectively create a band gap for certain frequencies of electro-magnetic radiation in the microwave and near-infrared ranges. The objective of thismore » research project was originally two-fold: to fabricate a three dimensional (3-D) structure of a size scaled to prohibit electromagnetic propagation within the visible wavelength range, and then to characterize that structure using laser dye emission spectra. As a master mold has not yet been developed for the micro transfer molding technique in the visible range, the research was limited to scaling down the length scale as much as possible with the current available technology and characterizing these structures with other methods.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
797330
Report Number(s):
IS-T 1981
TRN: US200215%%332
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-Eng-82
Resource Type:
Thesis/Dissertation
Resource Relation:
Other Information: TH: Thesis (M.S.); Submitted to Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (US); PBD: 1 May 2001
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; BRAGG REFLECTION; DIELECTRIC MATERIALS; EFFICIENCY; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; ELECTRONS; EMISSION SPECTRA; LASERS; LIGHT EMITTING DIODES; MOLDING; RADIATIONS; SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS; WAVELENGTHS

Citation Formats

Sutherland, Kevin Jerome. The Development of Layered Photonic Band Gap Structures Using a Micro-Transfer Molding Technique. United States: N. p., 2001. Web. doi:10.2172/797330.
Sutherland, Kevin Jerome. The Development of Layered Photonic Band Gap Structures Using a Micro-Transfer Molding Technique. United States. doi:10.2172/797330.
Sutherland, Kevin Jerome. Mon . "The Development of Layered Photonic Band Gap Structures Using a Micro-Transfer Molding Technique". United States. doi:10.2172/797330. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/797330.
@article{osti_797330,
title = {The Development of Layered Photonic Band Gap Structures Using a Micro-Transfer Molding Technique},
author = {Sutherland, Kevin Jerome},
abstractNote = {Photonic band gap (PBG) crystals are periodic dielectric structures that manipulate electromagnetic radiation in a manner similar to semiconductor devices manipulating electrons. Whereas a semiconductor material exhibits an electronic band gap in which electrons cannot exist, similarly, a photonic crystal containing a photonic band gap does not allow the propagation of specific frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. This phenomenon results from the destructive Bragg diffraction interference that a wave propagating at a specific frequency will experience because of the periodic change in dielectric permitivity. This gives rise to a variety of optical applications for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of opto-electronic devices. These applications are reviewed later. Several methods are currently used to fabricate photonic crystals, which are also discussed in detail. This research involves a layer-by-layer micro-transfer molding ({mu}TM) and stacking method to create three-dimensional FCC structures of epoxy or titania. The structures, once reduced significantly in size can be infiltrated with an organic gain media and stacked on a semiconductor to improve the efficiency of an electronically pumped light-emitting diode. Photonic band gap structures have been proven to effectively create a band gap for certain frequencies of electro-magnetic radiation in the microwave and near-infrared ranges. The objective of this research project was originally two-fold: to fabricate a three dimensional (3-D) structure of a size scaled to prohibit electromagnetic propagation within the visible wavelength range, and then to characterize that structure using laser dye emission spectra. As a master mold has not yet been developed for the micro transfer molding technique in the visible range, the research was limited to scaling down the length scale as much as possible with the current available technology and characterizing these structures with other methods.},
doi = {10.2172/797330},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2001},
month = {1}
}

Thesis/Dissertation:
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