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Title: Fusion Implementation

Abstract

If a fusion DEMO reactor can be brought into operation during the first half of this century, fusion power production can have a significant impact on carbon dioxide production during the latter half of the century. An assessment of fusion implementation scenarios shows that the resource demands and waste production associated with these scenarios are manageable factors. If fusion is implemented during the latter half of this century it will be one element of a portfolio of (hopefully) carbon dioxide limiting sources of electrical power. It is time to assess the regional implications of fusion power implementation. An important attribute of fusion power is the wide range of possible regions of the country, or countries in the world, where power plants can be located. Unlike most renewable energy options, fusion energy will function within a local distribution system and not require costly, and difficult, long distance transmission systems. For example, the East Coast of the United States is a prime candidate for fusion power deployment by virtue of its distance from renewable energy sources. As fossil fuels become less and less available as an energy option, the transmission of energy across bodies of water will become very expensive. On amore » global scale, fusion power will be particularly attractive for regions separated from sources of renewable energy by oceans.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (US)
OSTI Identifier:
796127
Report Number(s):
PPPL-3673.pdf
TRN: US0201456
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-76CH03073
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 20 Feb 2002
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; CARBON DIOXIDE; DISTRIBUTION; FOSSIL FUELS; IMPLEMENTATION; POWER PLANTS; PRODUCTION; RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES; THERMONUCLEAR REACTORS; WASTES; WATER

Citation Formats

J.A. Schmidt. Fusion Implementation. United States: N. p., 2002. Web. doi:10.2172/796127.
J.A. Schmidt. Fusion Implementation. United States. doi:10.2172/796127.
J.A. Schmidt. Wed . "Fusion Implementation". United States. doi:10.2172/796127. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/796127.
@article{osti_796127,
title = {Fusion Implementation},
author = {J.A. Schmidt},
abstractNote = {If a fusion DEMO reactor can be brought into operation during the first half of this century, fusion power production can have a significant impact on carbon dioxide production during the latter half of the century. An assessment of fusion implementation scenarios shows that the resource demands and waste production associated with these scenarios are manageable factors. If fusion is implemented during the latter half of this century it will be one element of a portfolio of (hopefully) carbon dioxide limiting sources of electrical power. It is time to assess the regional implications of fusion power implementation. An important attribute of fusion power is the wide range of possible regions of the country, or countries in the world, where power plants can be located. Unlike most renewable energy options, fusion energy will function within a local distribution system and not require costly, and difficult, long distance transmission systems. For example, the East Coast of the United States is a prime candidate for fusion power deployment by virtue of its distance from renewable energy sources. As fossil fuels become less and less available as an energy option, the transmission of energy across bodies of water will become very expensive. On a global scale, fusion power will be particularly attractive for regions separated from sources of renewable energy by oceans.},
doi = {10.2172/796127},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2002},
month = {2}
}