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Title: Challenges for Plasma Diagnostics in a Next Step Device (FIRE)

Abstract

The physics program of any next-step tokamak such as FIRE [Fusion Ignition Research Experiment] sets demands for plasma measurement which are at least as comprehensive as on present tokamaks, with the additional capabilities needed for control of the plasma and for understanding the effects of the alpha-particles. The diagnostic instrumentation must be able to provide the fine spatial and temporal resolution required for the advanced tokamak plasma scenarios. It must also be able to overcome the effects of neutron- and gamma-induced electrical noise in ceramic components or detectors, and fluorescence and absorption in optical components. There are practical engineering issues of minimizing radiation streaming while providing essential diagnostic access to the plasma. Many diagnostics will require components at or close to the first wall, e.g., ceramics and MI cable for magnetic diagnostics and mirrors for optical diagnostics; these components must be mounted to operate, and survive, i n fluxes which require special material selection. A better set of diagnostics of alpha-particles than that available for the TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] is essential; it must be qualified well before moving into D-T [deuterim-tritium] experiments. A start has been made to assessing the potential implementation of key diagnostics for the FIREmore » device. The present status is described.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (US)
OSTI Identifier:
795720
Report Number(s):
PPPL-3660.pdf
TRN: US0201848
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-76CH03073
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Supercedes report DE00795720; PBD: 28 Jan 2002; PBD: 28 Jan 2002
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS; 70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; ABSORPTION; ALPHA PARTICLES; CERAMICS; FIRST WALL; FLUORESCENCE; IGNITION; IMPLEMENTATION; MIRRORS; PHYSICS; PLASMA DIAGNOSTICS; RADIATION STREAMING; RESOLUTION; TEST REACTORS

Citation Formats

Kenneth M. Young. Challenges for Plasma Diagnostics in a Next Step Device (FIRE). United States: N. p., 2002. Web. doi:10.2172/795720.
Kenneth M. Young. Challenges for Plasma Diagnostics in a Next Step Device (FIRE). United States. doi:10.2172/795720.
Kenneth M. Young. Mon . "Challenges for Plasma Diagnostics in a Next Step Device (FIRE)". United States. doi:10.2172/795720. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/795720.
@article{osti_795720,
title = {Challenges for Plasma Diagnostics in a Next Step Device (FIRE)},
author = {Kenneth M. Young},
abstractNote = {The physics program of any next-step tokamak such as FIRE [Fusion Ignition Research Experiment] sets demands for plasma measurement which are at least as comprehensive as on present tokamaks, with the additional capabilities needed for control of the plasma and for understanding the effects of the alpha-particles. The diagnostic instrumentation must be able to provide the fine spatial and temporal resolution required for the advanced tokamak plasma scenarios. It must also be able to overcome the effects of neutron- and gamma-induced electrical noise in ceramic components or detectors, and fluorescence and absorption in optical components. There are practical engineering issues of minimizing radiation streaming while providing essential diagnostic access to the plasma. Many diagnostics will require components at or close to the first wall, e.g., ceramics and MI cable for magnetic diagnostics and mirrors for optical diagnostics; these components must be mounted to operate, and survive, i n fluxes which require special material selection. A better set of diagnostics of alpha-particles than that available for the TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] is essential; it must be qualified well before moving into D-T [deuterim-tritium] experiments. A start has been made to assessing the potential implementation of key diagnostics for the FIRE device. The present status is described.},
doi = {10.2172/795720},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2002},
month = {1}
}