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Title: A new Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb alloy for high temperature applications

Abstract

Various applications exist where a high conductivity alloy with good strength and creep resistance are required. NASA LeRC has developed a Cu-8 at. percent Cr-4 at. percent Nb (Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb) alloy for these applications. The alloy is designed for use up to 700 C and shows exceptional strength, low cycle fatigue (LCF) resistance, and creep resistance. Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb also has a thermal conductivity of at least 72 percent that of pure Cu. Furthermore, the microstructure and mechanical properties of the alloy are very stable. In addition to the original application in combustion chambers, Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb shows promise for welding electrodes, brazing fixtures, and other applications requiring high conductivity and strength at elevated temperatures.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center
OSTI Identifier:
79561
Report Number(s):
N-95-27728; NASA-TM-106910; E-9612; NAS-1.15:106910
CNN: NCC3-94;RTOP 242-20-06; TRN: 9527728
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Jun 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; COPPER BASE ALLOYS; THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY; CREEP; FLEXURAL STRENGTH; CHROMIUM ALLOYS; NIOBIUM ALLOYS; MICROSTRUCTURE

Citation Formats

Ellis, D.L., Michal, G.M., and Dreshfield, R.L. A new Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb alloy for high temperature applications. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Ellis, D.L., Michal, G.M., & Dreshfield, R.L. A new Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb alloy for high temperature applications. United States.
Ellis, D.L., Michal, G.M., and Dreshfield, R.L. 1995. "A new Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb alloy for high temperature applications". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_79561,
title = {A new Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb alloy for high temperature applications},
author = {Ellis, D.L. and Michal, G.M. and Dreshfield, R.L.},
abstractNote = {Various applications exist where a high conductivity alloy with good strength and creep resistance are required. NASA LeRC has developed a Cu-8 at. percent Cr-4 at. percent Nb (Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb) alloy for these applications. The alloy is designed for use up to 700 C and shows exceptional strength, low cycle fatigue (LCF) resistance, and creep resistance. Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb also has a thermal conductivity of at least 72 percent that of pure Cu. Furthermore, the microstructure and mechanical properties of the alloy are very stable. In addition to the original application in combustion chambers, Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb shows promise for welding electrodes, brazing fixtures, and other applications requiring high conductivity and strength at elevated temperatures.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1995,
month = 6
}

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