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Title: Enhanced Geothermal System Development of the AmeriCulture Leasehold in the Animas Valley

Abstract

Working under the grant with AmeriCulture, Inc., and its team of geothermal experts, assembled a plan to apply enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) techniques to increase both the temperature and flow rate of the geothermal waters on its leasehold. AmeriCulture operates a commercial aquaculture facility that will benefit from the larger quantities of thermal energy and low cost electric power that EGS technology can provide. The project brought together a team of specialists that, as a group, provided the full range of expertise required to successfully develop and implement the project.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Americulture, Inc (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
(US)
OSTI Identifier:
794068
Report Number(s):
DOE/ID/13990
TRN: US200208%%238
DOE Contract Number:
FG07-00ID13990
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 2 Mar 2001
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; AQUACULTURE; ELECTRIC POWER; FLOW RATE; GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS; Geothermal Legacy

Citation Formats

Duchane, David V, Seawright, Gary L, Sewright, Damon E, Brown, Don, Witcher, James c., and Nichols, Kenneth E. Enhanced Geothermal System Development of the AmeriCulture Leasehold in the Animas Valley. United States: N. p., 2001. Web. doi:10.2172/794068.
Duchane, David V, Seawright, Gary L, Sewright, Damon E, Brown, Don, Witcher, James c., & Nichols, Kenneth E. Enhanced Geothermal System Development of the AmeriCulture Leasehold in the Animas Valley. United States. doi:10.2172/794068.
Duchane, David V, Seawright, Gary L, Sewright, Damon E, Brown, Don, Witcher, James c., and Nichols, Kenneth E. Fri . "Enhanced Geothermal System Development of the AmeriCulture Leasehold in the Animas Valley". United States. doi:10.2172/794068. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/794068.
@article{osti_794068,
title = {Enhanced Geothermal System Development of the AmeriCulture Leasehold in the Animas Valley},
author = {Duchane, David V and Seawright, Gary L and Sewright, Damon E and Brown, Don and Witcher, James c. and Nichols, Kenneth E.},
abstractNote = {Working under the grant with AmeriCulture, Inc., and its team of geothermal experts, assembled a plan to apply enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) techniques to increase both the temperature and flow rate of the geothermal waters on its leasehold. AmeriCulture operates a commercial aquaculture facility that will benefit from the larger quantities of thermal energy and low cost electric power that EGS technology can provide. The project brought together a team of specialists that, as a group, provided the full range of expertise required to successfully develop and implement the project.},
doi = {10.2172/794068},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Mar 02 00:00:00 EST 2001},
month = {Fri Mar 02 00:00:00 EST 2001}
}

Technical Report:

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  • The concept of producing energy from hot dry rock (HDR), originally proposed in 1971 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, contemplated the generation of electric power by injecting water into artificially created fractures in subsurface rock formations with high heat flow. Recognizing the inherent difficulties associated with HDR, the concept of Enhanced Geothermal Systems was proposed. This embraces the idea that the amount of permeability and fluid in geothermal resources varies across a spectrum, with HDR at one end, and conventional hydrothermal systems at the other. This report provides a concept for development of a ''Combined Technologies Project'' with constructionmore » and operation of a 6 MW (net) binary-cycle geothermal power plant that uses both the intermediate-depth hydrothermal system at 1,200 to 3,300 feet and a deeper EGS capable system at 3,000 to 4,000 feet. Two production/injection well pairs will be drilled, one couplet for the hydrothermal system, and one for the E GS system. High-pressure injection may be required to drive fluid through the EGS reservoir from the injection to the production well.« less
  • Final Technical Report covering siting, permitting, and drilling two geothermal temperature gradient holes. This report provides a summary of geotechnical and geophysical data that led to the siting, drilling, and completion of 2 temperature gradient holes in the geothermal anomaly at Lightning Dock Known Geothermal Resource Area in the Animas Valley of New Mexico. Included in this report is a summary of institutional factors and data defining the well drilling process and acquiring drilling permits. Data covering the results of the drilling and temperature logging of these two holes are provided. The two gradient holes were sited on federal geothermalmore » leases owned by Lightning Dock Geothermal, Inc. and both holes were drilled into lakebed sediments some distance from the intense shallow geothermal anomaly located in the eastern half of Section 7, Township 25 South, Range 19 West.« less
  • This report contains a detailed summary of a methodical and comprehensive assessment of the potential of the Animas Valley, New Mexico geothermal resource leasehold owned by Lightning Dock Geothermal, Inc. Work described herein was completed under the auspices of the Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-FC04-00AL66977, Geothermal Resource Evaluation and Definition (GRED) Program, and the work covers the time span from June 2001 through June 2004. Included in this new report are detailed results from the GRED Program, including: geophysical and geochemical surveys, reflection seismic surveys, aeromagnetic surveys, gravity and electrical resistivity surveys, soil thermal ion and soil carbonmore » dioxide flux surveys, four temperature gradient holes, and one deep exploratory well.« less
  • This circular covers the geology of the Pyramid Peak, Swallow Fork Peak, Table Top Mountain, and South Pyramid Peak 7-1/2-min quadrangles, which include the Lightning Dock KGRA. Hot wells (70 to 115.5/sup 0/C) seem to be structurally controlled by intersections of the ring-fracture zone of an Oligocene ash-flow tuff cauldron (Muir cauldron), a Miocene-to-Holocene north-trending basin-and-range fault (Animas Valley fault), and a northeast-trending lineament that appears to control anomalously heated underground waters and Pliocene-Pleistocene basalt cones in the San Bernardino, San Simon, and Animas Valleys. The Muir cauldron, approximately 20 km in diameter, collapsed in two stages, each associated withmore » the eruption of a rhyolite ash-flow-tuff sheet and of ring-fracture domes. Most of the hydrothermal alteration of the Lightning Dock KGRA is related to the first stage of eruption and collapse, not to the modern geothermal system. Contrary to previous reports, no silicic volcanic rocks younger than basin-and-range faulting are known; unconformities beneath rhyolite ring-fracture domes are caused by Oligocene caldera collapse, not by basin-and-range faulting. The Animas Valley is the site of widespread post-20 My travertine deposits and near-surface veins of calcite, fluorite, and/or psilomelane, controlled by north- or northwest-trending basin-and-range faults. The fluoride-bearing waters of the Lightning Dock KGRA may be a late stage of this hydrothermal activity. Distribution of Pliocene-Pleistocene basalt suggests that deep-seated basalt near the solids may be the ultimate heat source.« less
  • The Colorado Geological Survey, has been engaged in assessing the nature and extent of Colorado's geothermal resources. The program has included geologic and hydrogeologic reconnaissance, and geophysical and geochemical surveys. In the Animas Valley, in southwestern Colorado, two groups of thermal springs exist: Pinkerton Springs to the north, and Tripp-Trimble-Stratten Springs about 5 miles (8.1 Km) south of Pinkerton. The geothermal resources of the Animas Valley were studied. Due to terrain problems in the narrow valley, a soil mercury survey was conducted only at Tripp-Trimble Stratten, while an electrical D.C. resistivity survey was limited to the vicinity of Pinkerton. Althoughmore » higher mercury values tended to be near a previously mapped fault, the small extent of the survey ruled out conclusive results. Consistent low resistivity zones interpreted from the geophysical data were mapped as faults near Pinkerton, and compared well with aerial photo work and spring locations. This new information was added to reconnaissance geology and hydrogeology to provide several clues regarding the geothermal potential of the valley. Hydrothermal minerals found in faults in the study area are very similar to ore mined in a very young mountain range, nearby. Groundwater would not need to circulate very deeply along faults to attain the estimated subsurface temperatures present in the valley. The water chemistry of each area is unique. Although previously incompletely manned, faulting in the area is extensive. The geothermal resources in the Animas Valley are fault controlled. Pinkerton and Tripp-Trimble-Stratten are probably not directly connected systems, but may have the same source at distance. Recharge to the geothermal system comes from the needle and La Plata Mountains, and the latter may also be a heat source. Movement of the thermal water is probably primarily horizontal, via the Leadville Limestone aquifer.« less