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Title: Correlation of Chemisorption and Electronic Effects for Metal Oxide Interfaces: Transducing Principles for Temperature Programmed Gas Microsensors (Final Report)

Abstract

This Final Report describes efforts and results for a 3-year DoE/OST-EMSP project centered at NIST. The multidisciplinary project investigated scientific and technical concepts critical for developing tunable, MEMS-based, gas and vapor microsensors that could be applied for monitoring the types of multiple analytes (and differing backgrounds) encountered at DoE waste sites. Micromachined ''microhotplate'' arrays were used as platforms for fabricating conductometric sensor prototypes, and as microscale research tools. Efficient microarray techniques were developed for locally depositing and then performance evaluating thin oxide films, in order to correlate gas sensing characteristics with properties including composition, microstructure, thickness and surface modification. This approach produced temperature-dependent databases on the sensitivities of sensing materials to varied analytes (in air) which enable application-specific tuning of microsensor arrays. Mechanistic studies on adsorb ate transient phenomena were conducted to better understand the ways in which rapid temperature programming schedules can be used to produce unique response signatures and increase information density in microsensor signals. Chemometric and neural network analyses were also employed in our studies for recognition and quantification of target analytes.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. National Institute of Standards and Technology (US)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Institute of Standards and Technology (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Environmental Management (EM); EM-50 (US)
OSTI Identifier:
793127
DOE Contract Number:  
AI07-98ER62709
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 21 Dec 2001
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; CHEMISORPTION; MICROSTRUCTURE; MONITORING; NEURAL NETWORKS; OXIDES; PROGRAMMING; SCHEDULES; TARGETS; THICKNESS; TRANSIENTS; TUNING; WASTES; ADSORBATE TRANSIENTS; ADSORPTION; CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION; CHEMOMETRICS; COMBINATORIAL SCIENCE; CROSSTALK; DESORPTION; ELECTRICAL CONDUCTANCE; GAS MICROSENSOR; MEMS; METAL OXIDE; METALS; MICROARRAYS; MICROHOTPLATE; MICROMACHINING; NANOPARTICLE; SILICON; SURFACE ELECTRONICS; TEMPERATURE PROGAMMING; THIN FILMS; VOLATILE ORGANICS

Citation Formats

Semancik, S, Cavicchi, R E, DeVoe, D L, McAvoy, T J, and University of Maryland. Correlation of Chemisorption and Electronic Effects for Metal Oxide Interfaces: Transducing Principles for Temperature Programmed Gas Microsensors (Final Report). United States: N. p., 2001. Web. doi:10.2172/793127.
Semancik, S, Cavicchi, R E, DeVoe, D L, McAvoy, T J, & University of Maryland. Correlation of Chemisorption and Electronic Effects for Metal Oxide Interfaces: Transducing Principles for Temperature Programmed Gas Microsensors (Final Report). United States. doi:10.2172/793127.
Semancik, S, Cavicchi, R E, DeVoe, D L, McAvoy, T J, and University of Maryland. Fri . "Correlation of Chemisorption and Electronic Effects for Metal Oxide Interfaces: Transducing Principles for Temperature Programmed Gas Microsensors (Final Report)". United States. doi:10.2172/793127. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/793127.
@article{osti_793127,
title = {Correlation of Chemisorption and Electronic Effects for Metal Oxide Interfaces: Transducing Principles for Temperature Programmed Gas Microsensors (Final Report)},
author = {Semancik, S and Cavicchi, R E and DeVoe, D L and McAvoy, T J and University of Maryland},
abstractNote = {This Final Report describes efforts and results for a 3-year DoE/OST-EMSP project centered at NIST. The multidisciplinary project investigated scientific and technical concepts critical for developing tunable, MEMS-based, gas and vapor microsensors that could be applied for monitoring the types of multiple analytes (and differing backgrounds) encountered at DoE waste sites. Micromachined ''microhotplate'' arrays were used as platforms for fabricating conductometric sensor prototypes, and as microscale research tools. Efficient microarray techniques were developed for locally depositing and then performance evaluating thin oxide films, in order to correlate gas sensing characteristics with properties including composition, microstructure, thickness and surface modification. This approach produced temperature-dependent databases on the sensitivities of sensing materials to varied analytes (in air) which enable application-specific tuning of microsensor arrays. Mechanistic studies on adsorb ate transient phenomena were conducted to better understand the ways in which rapid temperature programming schedules can be used to produce unique response signatures and increase information density in microsensor signals. Chemometric and neural network analyses were also employed in our studies for recognition and quantification of target analytes.},
doi = {10.2172/793127},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2001},
month = {12}
}