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Title: Revitalization of Undergraduate and Graduate Nuclear Instrumentation Program at the University of Texas

Abstract

A comprehensive effort was undertaken to modernize nuclear instrumentation for undergraduate and graduate teaching and research for the Nuclear and Radiation Engineering Program at the University of Texas.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
University of Texas at Austin (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Research (ER) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
793046
Report Number(s):
UT 26-0835-01
TRN: US0200893
DOE Contract Number:
FG03-00NE38169
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 29 Mar 2002
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; NUCLEAR ENGINEERING; TEXAS; EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES; RADIATION DETECTORS; REACTOR INSTRUMENTATION; EDUCATIONAL TOOLS; UNDERGRADUATE AND NUCLEAR ENGINEERING, INSTRUMENTATION, EDUCATIONAL

Citation Formats

Dr. Sheldon Landsberger s.landsberger@mail.utexas.edu. Revitalization of Undergraduate and Graduate Nuclear Instrumentation Program at the University of Texas. United States: N. p., 2002. Web.
Dr. Sheldon Landsberger s.landsberger@mail.utexas.edu. Revitalization of Undergraduate and Graduate Nuclear Instrumentation Program at the University of Texas. United States.
Dr. Sheldon Landsberger s.landsberger@mail.utexas.edu. Fri . "Revitalization of Undergraduate and Graduate Nuclear Instrumentation Program at the University of Texas". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_793046,
title = {Revitalization of Undergraduate and Graduate Nuclear Instrumentation Program at the University of Texas},
author = {Dr. Sheldon Landsberger s.landsberger@mail.utexas.edu},
abstractNote = {A comprehensive effort was undertaken to modernize nuclear instrumentation for undergraduate and graduate teaching and research for the Nuclear and Radiation Engineering Program at the University of Texas.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Mar 29 00:00:00 EST 2002},
month = {Fri Mar 29 00:00:00 EST 2002}
}

Technical Report:
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