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Title: Highly-Resolved LES of the Stable Boundary Layer Over Terrain

Abstract

One of the most important scenarios for atmospheric modelers is the stable boundary layer (SBL). Airborne material released near the ground will likely be trapped near the ground in high concentrations due to the reduced dispersion in the SBL. Hence the SBL is often the worst case scenario for studies of health impacts from routine or accidental release of toxic materials to the atmosphere. Unfortunately the SBL is very challenging to understand and model correctly. There is also a limited number of field studies with which to verify models, although recent studies (such as CASES-99) are promising. It is difficult for traditional Reynolds-averaged models of turbulence to capture the weak, spatially- and temporally-varying fluctuations that contribute to dispersion the SBL. Large-eddy simulation (LES) has become a promising approach study the SBL because much of the dynamical structure is explicitly resolved and allowed to develop according to the full equations of motion. The presence of topography further complicates the simulation of SBL flows. The drainage flows that develop as the surface cools must be resolved, along with their interaction with other drainage flows of varying scales and the main forcing (synoptic scale) flow. In this study, we have used LES techniquesmore » to simulate flows in complex terrain during the development of the SBL at night. We have begun to evaluate the effects of resolution on the simulations, though this effort is continuing at the time of this writing. Simulations are conducted for the area around Salt Lake City, where several field activities are planned for the future. The study will be extended to the small scale terrain associated with the CASES-99 experiment, and comparisons made with observations.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Defense Programs (DP) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
792809
Report Number(s):
UCRL-JC-137628
TRN: US200302%%505
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-Eng-48
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: American Meteorological Society 14th Symposium on Boundary Layers and Turbulence, Aspen, CO (US), 08/07/2000--08/11/2000; Other Information: PBD: 31 May 2000
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; BOUNDARY LAYERS; COMPLEX TERRAIN; DRAINAGE; EQUATIONS OF MOTION; FLUCTUATIONS; LAKES; RESOLUTION; SIMULATION; TOPOGRAPHY; TOXIC MATERIALS; TURBULENCE

Citation Formats

Calhoun, R, Cederwall, R T, Stevens, D, and Street, R. Highly-Resolved LES of the Stable Boundary Layer Over Terrain. United States: N. p., 2000. Web.
Calhoun, R, Cederwall, R T, Stevens, D, & Street, R. Highly-Resolved LES of the Stable Boundary Layer Over Terrain. United States.
Calhoun, R, Cederwall, R T, Stevens, D, and Street, R. Wed . "Highly-Resolved LES of the Stable Boundary Layer Over Terrain". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/792809.
@article{osti_792809,
title = {Highly-Resolved LES of the Stable Boundary Layer Over Terrain},
author = {Calhoun, R and Cederwall, R T and Stevens, D and Street, R},
abstractNote = {One of the most important scenarios for atmospheric modelers is the stable boundary layer (SBL). Airborne material released near the ground will likely be trapped near the ground in high concentrations due to the reduced dispersion in the SBL. Hence the SBL is often the worst case scenario for studies of health impacts from routine or accidental release of toxic materials to the atmosphere. Unfortunately the SBL is very challenging to understand and model correctly. There is also a limited number of field studies with which to verify models, although recent studies (such as CASES-99) are promising. It is difficult for traditional Reynolds-averaged models of turbulence to capture the weak, spatially- and temporally-varying fluctuations that contribute to dispersion the SBL. Large-eddy simulation (LES) has become a promising approach study the SBL because much of the dynamical structure is explicitly resolved and allowed to develop according to the full equations of motion. The presence of topography further complicates the simulation of SBL flows. The drainage flows that develop as the surface cools must be resolved, along with their interaction with other drainage flows of varying scales and the main forcing (synoptic scale) flow. In this study, we have used LES techniques to simulate flows in complex terrain during the development of the SBL at night. We have begun to evaluate the effects of resolution on the simulations, though this effort is continuing at the time of this writing. Simulations are conducted for the area around Salt Lake City, where several field activities are planned for the future. The study will be extended to the small scale terrain associated with the CASES-99 experiment, and comparisons made with observations.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {5}
}

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