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Title: Electromagnetic fields in cased borehole

Abstract

Borehole electromagnetic (EM) measurements, using fiberglass-cased boreholes, have proven useful in oil field reservoir characterization and process monitoring (Wilt et al., 1995). It has been presumed that these measurements would be impossible in steel-cased wells due to the very large EM attenuation and phase shifts. Recent laboratory and field studies have indicated that detection of EM signals through steel casing should be possible at low frequencies, and that these data provide a reasonable conductivity image at a useful scale. Thus, we see an increased application of this technique to mature oilfields, and an immediate extension to geothermal industry as well. Along with the field experiments numerical model studies have been carried out for analyzing the effect of steel casing to the EM fields. The model used to be an infinitely long uniform casing embedded in a homogeneous whole space. Nevertheless, the results indicated that the formation signal could be accurately recovered if the casing characteristics were independently known (Becker et al., 1998; Lee el al., 1998). Real steel-cased wells are much more complex than the simple laboratory models used in work to date. The purpose of this study is to develop efficient numerical methods for analyzing EM fields in realisticmore » settings, and to evaluate the potential application of EM technologies to cross-borehole and single-hole environment for reservoir characterization and monitoring.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy. Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Technology. Natural Gas and Petroleum Upstream Exploration and Production; Industry (US)
OSTI Identifier:
789994
Report Number(s):
LBNL-47005-Ext.-Abs.
R&D Project: 468103; TRN: US200202%%102
DOE Contract Number:
AC03-76SF00098
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: The 5th SEGJ International Symposium--Imaging Technology, Tokyo (JP), 01/24/2001--01/26/2001; Other Information: PBD: 20 Jul 2001
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; 15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ATTENUATION; BOREHOLES; DETECTION; ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS; GEOTHERMAL INDUSTRY; MONITORING; OIL FIELDS; PHASE SHIFT; STEELS; Geothermal Legacy; CASING ELECTROMAGNETIC

Citation Formats

Lee, Ki Ha, Kim, Hee Joon, and Uchida, Toshihiro. Electromagnetic fields in cased borehole. United States: N. p., 2001. Web.
Lee, Ki Ha, Kim, Hee Joon, & Uchida, Toshihiro. Electromagnetic fields in cased borehole. United States.
Lee, Ki Ha, Kim, Hee Joon, and Uchida, Toshihiro. Fri . "Electromagnetic fields in cased borehole". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/789994.
@article{osti_789994,
title = {Electromagnetic fields in cased borehole},
author = {Lee, Ki Ha and Kim, Hee Joon and Uchida, Toshihiro},
abstractNote = {Borehole electromagnetic (EM) measurements, using fiberglass-cased boreholes, have proven useful in oil field reservoir characterization and process monitoring (Wilt et al., 1995). It has been presumed that these measurements would be impossible in steel-cased wells due to the very large EM attenuation and phase shifts. Recent laboratory and field studies have indicated that detection of EM signals through steel casing should be possible at low frequencies, and that these data provide a reasonable conductivity image at a useful scale. Thus, we see an increased application of this technique to mature oilfields, and an immediate extension to geothermal industry as well. Along with the field experiments numerical model studies have been carried out for analyzing the effect of steel casing to the EM fields. The model used to be an infinitely long uniform casing embedded in a homogeneous whole space. Nevertheless, the results indicated that the formation signal could be accurately recovered if the casing characteristics were independently known (Becker et al., 1998; Lee el al., 1998). Real steel-cased wells are much more complex than the simple laboratory models used in work to date. The purpose of this study is to develop efficient numerical methods for analyzing EM fields in realistic settings, and to evaluate the potential application of EM technologies to cross-borehole and single-hole environment for reservoir characterization and monitoring.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jul 20 00:00:00 EDT 2001},
month = {Fri Jul 20 00:00:00 EDT 2001}
}

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  • No abstract prepared.
  • A study was undertaken to investigate the feasibility of sonic logging in a cased borehole. Results were obtained from a scaled-model laboratory experiment and from computer simulations. The waveforms from the computer model indicate that sonic logging can be successful in bonded and unbonded cased holes. A slowness-time semblance signal processing technique is used to obtain wave velocities from waveforms.
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