skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: ''A Parallel Adaptive Simulation Tool for Two Phase Steady State Reacting Flows in Industrial Boilers and Furnaces''

Abstract

This DOE SBIR Phase II final report summarizes research that has been performed to develop a parallel adaptive tool for modeling steady, two phase turbulent reacting flow. The target applications for the new tool are full scale, fossil-fuel fired boilers and furnaces such as those used in the electric utility industry, chemical process industry and mineral/metal process industry. The type of analyses to be performed on these systems are engineering calculations to evaluate the impact on overall furnace performance due to operational, process or equipment changes. To develop a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model of an industrial scale furnace requires a carefully designed grid that will capture all of the large and small scale features of the flowfield. Industrial systems are quite large, usually measured in tens of feet, but contain numerous burners, air injection ports, flames and localized behavior with dimensions that are measured in inches or fractions of inches. To create an accurate computational model of such systems requires capturing length scales within the flow field that span several orders of magnitude. In addition, to create an industrially useful model, the grid can not contain too many grid points - the model must be able to execute onmore » an inexpensive desktop PC in a matter of days. An adaptive mesh provides a convenient means to create a grid that can capture both fine flow field detail within a very large domain with a ''reasonable'' number of grid points. However, the use of an adaptive mesh requires the development of a new flow solver. To create the new simulation tool, we have combined existing reacting CFD modeling software with new software based on emerging block structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) technologies developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Specifically, we combined: -physical models, modeling expertise, and software from existing combustion simulation codes used by Reaction Engineering International; -mesh adaption, data management, and parallelization software and technology being developed by users of the BoxLib library at LBNL; and -solution methods for problems formulated on block structured grids that were being developed in collaboration with technical staff members at the University of Utah Center for High Performance Computing (CHPC) and at LBNL. The combustion modeling software used by Reaction Engineering International represents an investment of over fifty man-years of development, conducted over a period of twenty years. Thus, it was impractical to achieve our objective by starting from scratch. The research program resulted in an adaptive grid, reacting CFD flow solver that can be used only on limited problems. In current form the code is appropriate for use on academic problems with simplified geometries. The new solver is not sufficiently robust or sufficiently general to be used in a ''production mode'' for industrial applications. The principle difficulty lies with the multi-level solver technology. The use of multi-level solvers on adaptive grids with embedded boundaries is not yet a mature field and there are many issues that remain to be resolved. From the lessons learned in this SBIR program, we have started work on a new flow solver with an AMR capability. The new code is based on a conventional cell-by-cell mesh refinement strategy used in unstructured grid solvers that employ hexahedral cells. The new solver employs several of the concepts and solution strategies developed within this research program. The formulation of the composite grid problem for the new solver has been designed to avoid the embedded boundary complications encountered in this SBIR project. This follow-on effort will result in a reacting flow CFD solver with localized mesh capability that can be used to perform engineering calculations on industrial problems in a production mode.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Reaction Engineering International, Salt Lake City, UT (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC); USDOE Office of Energy Research (ER) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
789942
Report Number(s):
DOE ER82268 R01
TRN: US200308%%421
DOE Contract Number:  
FG03-96ER82268
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 4 Jan 2002
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; AIR; BOILERS; BURNERS; COMBUSTION; DIMENSIONS; FLAMES; FURNACES; MANAGEMENT; PERFORMANCE; PRODUCTION; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; SIMULATION; TARGETS; CFD; ADAPTIVE MESH; PARALLEL COMPUTING; MULTI-LEVEL SOLVER; REACTION

Citation Formats

Bockelie, Michael J. ''A Parallel Adaptive Simulation Tool for Two Phase Steady State Reacting Flows in Industrial Boilers and Furnaces''. United States: N. p., 2002. Web.
Bockelie, Michael J. ''A Parallel Adaptive Simulation Tool for Two Phase Steady State Reacting Flows in Industrial Boilers and Furnaces''. United States.
Bockelie, Michael J. Fri . "''A Parallel Adaptive Simulation Tool for Two Phase Steady State Reacting Flows in Industrial Boilers and Furnaces''". United States.
@article{osti_789942,
title = {''A Parallel Adaptive Simulation Tool for Two Phase Steady State Reacting Flows in Industrial Boilers and Furnaces''},
author = {Bockelie, Michael J},
abstractNote = {This DOE SBIR Phase II final report summarizes research that has been performed to develop a parallel adaptive tool for modeling steady, two phase turbulent reacting flow. The target applications for the new tool are full scale, fossil-fuel fired boilers and furnaces such as those used in the electric utility industry, chemical process industry and mineral/metal process industry. The type of analyses to be performed on these systems are engineering calculations to evaluate the impact on overall furnace performance due to operational, process or equipment changes. To develop a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model of an industrial scale furnace requires a carefully designed grid that will capture all of the large and small scale features of the flowfield. Industrial systems are quite large, usually measured in tens of feet, but contain numerous burners, air injection ports, flames and localized behavior with dimensions that are measured in inches or fractions of inches. To create an accurate computational model of such systems requires capturing length scales within the flow field that span several orders of magnitude. In addition, to create an industrially useful model, the grid can not contain too many grid points - the model must be able to execute on an inexpensive desktop PC in a matter of days. An adaptive mesh provides a convenient means to create a grid that can capture both fine flow field detail within a very large domain with a ''reasonable'' number of grid points. However, the use of an adaptive mesh requires the development of a new flow solver. To create the new simulation tool, we have combined existing reacting CFD modeling software with new software based on emerging block structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) technologies developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Specifically, we combined: -physical models, modeling expertise, and software from existing combustion simulation codes used by Reaction Engineering International; -mesh adaption, data management, and parallelization software and technology being developed by users of the BoxLib library at LBNL; and -solution methods for problems formulated on block structured grids that were being developed in collaboration with technical staff members at the University of Utah Center for High Performance Computing (CHPC) and at LBNL. The combustion modeling software used by Reaction Engineering International represents an investment of over fifty man-years of development, conducted over a period of twenty years. Thus, it was impractical to achieve our objective by starting from scratch. The research program resulted in an adaptive grid, reacting CFD flow solver that can be used only on limited problems. In current form the code is appropriate for use on academic problems with simplified geometries. The new solver is not sufficiently robust or sufficiently general to be used in a ''production mode'' for industrial applications. The principle difficulty lies with the multi-level solver technology. The use of multi-level solvers on adaptive grids with embedded boundaries is not yet a mature field and there are many issues that remain to be resolved. From the lessons learned in this SBIR program, we have started work on a new flow solver with an AMR capability. The new code is based on a conventional cell-by-cell mesh refinement strategy used in unstructured grid solvers that employ hexahedral cells. The new solver employs several of the concepts and solution strategies developed within this research program. The formulation of the composite grid problem for the new solver has been designed to avoid the embedded boundary complications encountered in this SBIR project. This follow-on effort will result in a reacting flow CFD solver with localized mesh capability that can be used to perform engineering calculations on industrial problems in a production mode.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2002},
month = {1}
}

Technical Report:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that may hold this item. Keep in mind that many technical reports are not cataloged in WorldCat.

Save / Share: