skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: ROBOT TASK SCENE ANALYZER

Abstract

Environmental restoration and waste management (ER and WM) challenges in the United States Department of Energy (DOE), and around the world, involve radiation or other hazards which will necessitate the use of remote operations to protect human workers from dangerous exposures. Remote operations carry the implication of greater costs since remote work systems are inherently less productive than contact human work due to the inefficiencies/complexities of teleoperation. To reduce costs and improve quality, much attention has been focused on methods to improve the productivity of combined human operator/remote equipment systems; the achievements to date are modest at best. The most promising avenue in the near term is to supplement conventional remote work systems with robotic planning and control techniques borrowed from manufacturing and other domains where robotic automation has been used. Practical combinations of teleoperation and robotic control will yield telerobotic work systems that outperform currently available remote equipment. It is believed that practical telerobotic systems may increase remote work efficiencies significantly. Increases of 30% to 50% have been conservatively estimated for typical remote operations. It is important to recognize that the basic hardware and software features of most modern remote manipulation systems can readily accommodate the functionality required formore » telerobotics. Further, several of the additional system ingredients necessary to implement telerobotic control--machine vision, 3D object and workspace modeling, automatic tool path generation and collision-free trajectory planning--are existent.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, Morgantown, WV, and Albany, OR (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
789501
Report Number(s):
AR26-97FT34314-01
TRN: US0200054
DOE Contract Number:  
AR26-97FT34314
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1 Aug 2000
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; REMEDIAL ACTION; PLANNING; ROBOTS; REMOTE CONTROL; REMOTE VIEWING EQUIPMENT; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT

Citation Formats

Hamel, William R, and Everett, Steven. ROBOT TASK SCENE ANALYZER. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.2172/789501.
Hamel, William R, & Everett, Steven. ROBOT TASK SCENE ANALYZER. United States. doi:10.2172/789501.
Hamel, William R, and Everett, Steven. Tue . "ROBOT TASK SCENE ANALYZER". United States. doi:10.2172/789501. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/789501.
@article{osti_789501,
title = {ROBOT TASK SCENE ANALYZER},
author = {Hamel, William R and Everett, Steven},
abstractNote = {Environmental restoration and waste management (ER and WM) challenges in the United States Department of Energy (DOE), and around the world, involve radiation or other hazards which will necessitate the use of remote operations to protect human workers from dangerous exposures. Remote operations carry the implication of greater costs since remote work systems are inherently less productive than contact human work due to the inefficiencies/complexities of teleoperation. To reduce costs and improve quality, much attention has been focused on methods to improve the productivity of combined human operator/remote equipment systems; the achievements to date are modest at best. The most promising avenue in the near term is to supplement conventional remote work systems with robotic planning and control techniques borrowed from manufacturing and other domains where robotic automation has been used. Practical combinations of teleoperation and robotic control will yield telerobotic work systems that outperform currently available remote equipment. It is believed that practical telerobotic systems may increase remote work efficiencies significantly. Increases of 30% to 50% have been conservatively estimated for typical remote operations. It is important to recognize that the basic hardware and software features of most modern remote manipulation systems can readily accommodate the functionality required for telerobotics. Further, several of the additional system ingredients necessary to implement telerobotic control--machine vision, 3D object and workspace modeling, automatic tool path generation and collision-free trajectory planning--are existent.},
doi = {10.2172/789501},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {8}
}