skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Uptake of explosives from contaminated soil by existing vegetation at the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant

Abstract

This study examines the uptake of explosives by existing vegetation growing in soils contaminated with 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and 1,3,5-trinitro-3,5-triazine (RDX) in three areas at the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant (IAAP). To determine explosives uptake under natural environmental conditions, existing plant materials and soil from the root zone were sampled at different locations in each area, and plant materials were separated by species. Standard methods were used to determine the concentrations of explosives, their derivatives, and metabolites in the soil samples. Plant materials were also analyzed. The compound TNT was not detected in the aboveground portion of plants, and vegetation growing on TNT-contaminated soils is not considered a health hazard. However, soil and plant roots may contain TNT degradation products that may be toxic; hence, their consumption is not advised. The compound RDX was found in the tops and roots of plants growing on RDX-contaminated soils at all surveyed sites. Although RDX is not a listed carcinogen, several of its potentially present degradation products are carcinogens. Therefore, the consumption of any plant tissues growing on RDX-contaminated sites should be considered a potential health hazard.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Army Environmental Center, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Department of Defense, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
78929
Report Number(s):
SFIM-AEC-ET-CR-95013
ON: DE95012998; CNN: U.S.Army Environmental Center
DOE Contract Number:  
W-31-109-ENG-38
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Feb 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; CHEMICAL EXPLOSIVES; ROOT ABSORPTION; TNT; TRIAZINES; LAND POLLUTION; MILITARY FACILITIES; IOWA; SOIL CHEMISTRY; MAIZE; GRAMINEAE; LOCUST TREES

Citation Formats

Schneider, J F, Zellmer, S D, Tomczyk, N A, Rastorier, J R, Chen, D, and Banwart, W L. Uptake of explosives from contaminated soil by existing vegetation at the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant. United States: N. p., 1995. Web. doi:10.2172/78929.
Schneider, J F, Zellmer, S D, Tomczyk, N A, Rastorier, J R, Chen, D, & Banwart, W L. Uptake of explosives from contaminated soil by existing vegetation at the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/78929
Schneider, J F, Zellmer, S D, Tomczyk, N A, Rastorier, J R, Chen, D, and Banwart, W L. Wed . "Uptake of explosives from contaminated soil by existing vegetation at the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/78929. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/78929.
@article{osti_78929,
title = {Uptake of explosives from contaminated soil by existing vegetation at the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant},
author = {Schneider, J F and Zellmer, S D and Tomczyk, N A and Rastorier, J R and Chen, D and Banwart, W L},
abstractNote = {This study examines the uptake of explosives by existing vegetation growing in soils contaminated with 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and 1,3,5-trinitro-3,5-triazine (RDX) in three areas at the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant (IAAP). To determine explosives uptake under natural environmental conditions, existing plant materials and soil from the root zone were sampled at different locations in each area, and plant materials were separated by species. Standard methods were used to determine the concentrations of explosives, their derivatives, and metabolites in the soil samples. Plant materials were also analyzed. The compound TNT was not detected in the aboveground portion of plants, and vegetation growing on TNT-contaminated soils is not considered a health hazard. However, soil and plant roots may contain TNT degradation products that may be toxic; hence, their consumption is not advised. The compound RDX was found in the tops and roots of plants growing on RDX-contaminated soils at all surveyed sites. Although RDX is not a listed carcinogen, several of its potentially present degradation products are carcinogens. Therefore, the consumption of any plant tissues growing on RDX-contaminated sites should be considered a potential health hazard.},
doi = {10.2172/78929},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/78929}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1995},
month = {2}
}