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Title: AUTHENTICATION OF QUANTUM MESSAGES

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
789001
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-01-6419
TRN: US200306%%51
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Conference title not supplied, Conference location not supplied, Conference dates not supplied; Other Information: PBD: 1 Nov 2001
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; DATA TRANSMISSION; INFORMATION RETRIEVAL; COMPUTER NETWORKS; SECURITY

Citation Formats

H. BARNUM, C. CREPEAU, and ET AL. AUTHENTICATION OF QUANTUM MESSAGES. United States: N. p., 2001. Web.
H. BARNUM, C. CREPEAU, & ET AL. AUTHENTICATION OF QUANTUM MESSAGES. United States.
H. BARNUM, C. CREPEAU, and ET AL. Thu . "AUTHENTICATION OF QUANTUM MESSAGES". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/789001.
@article{osti_789001,
title = {AUTHENTICATION OF QUANTUM MESSAGES},
author = {H. BARNUM and C. CREPEAU and ET AL},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2001},
month = {Thu Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2001}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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