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Title: SIMULATION OF TWO TRAFFIC OPTIONS ON A HEAVILY TRAVELED ROAD ADJACENT TO LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
788955
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-01-6297
TRN: US200202%%321
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Conference title not supplied, Conference location not supplied, Conference dates not supplied; Other Information: PBD: 1 Nov 2001
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; ROADS; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; LANL; ROUTING

Citation Formats

E. VAN EECKHOUT, L. SMITH, and K. HENSON. SIMULATION OF TWO TRAFFIC OPTIONS ON A HEAVILY TRAVELED ROAD ADJACENT TO LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY. United States: N. p., 2001. Web.
E. VAN EECKHOUT, L. SMITH, & K. HENSON. SIMULATION OF TWO TRAFFIC OPTIONS ON A HEAVILY TRAVELED ROAD ADJACENT TO LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY. United States.
E. VAN EECKHOUT, L. SMITH, and K. HENSON. Thu . "SIMULATION OF TWO TRAFFIC OPTIONS ON A HEAVILY TRAVELED ROAD ADJACENT TO LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/788955.
@article{osti_788955,
title = {SIMULATION OF TWO TRAFFIC OPTIONS ON A HEAVILY TRAVELED ROAD ADJACENT TO LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY},
author = {E. VAN EECKHOUT and L. SMITH and K. HENSON},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2001},
month = {Thu Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2001}
}

Conference:
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  • The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) achieved a national milestone on the road to shipping transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) when it received certification authority on September 12, 1997. Since that time, LANL has been characterizing a non-mixed TRU waste stream and preparing shipments of this TRU waste for disposal in the WIPP. The paper describes the TRU waste identified as waste stream TA-55-43 Lot No. 01 from LANL Technical Area-55 and the process used to determine that it does not contain hazardous waste regulated by the Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) or the Newmore » Mexico Hazardous Waste Act (HWA). The non-mixed determination is based on the acceptable knowledge (AK) characterization process, which clearly shows that the waste does not exhibit any RCRA characteristics nor meet any RCRA listing descriptions. LANL has certified TRU waste from waste stream TA-55-43 Lot No. 01 and is prepared to certify additional quantities of TRU waste horn other non-mixed TRU waste streams. Assembly and preparation of AK on the processes that generated TRU waste is recognized as a necessary part of the process for having waste ready for shipment to the WIPP.« less
  • At present, >35% of the volume of newly generated transuranic (TRU) waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory is not certifiable for transport to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Noncertifiable waste would constitute 900--1,000 m{sup 3} of the 2,600 m{sup 3} of waste projected during the period of the Environmental Management (EM) Accelerated Cleanup: Focus on 2006 plan (DOE, 1997). Volume expansion of this waste to meet thermal limits would increase the shipped volume to {approximately}5,400 m{sup 3}. This paper presents the results of efforts to define which TRU waste streams are noncertifiable at Los Alamos, and to prioritize site-specificmore » options to reduce the volume of certifiable waste over the period of the EM Accelerated Cleanup Plan. A team of Los Alamos TRU waste generators and waste managers reviewed historic generation rates and thermal loads and current practices to estimate the projected volume and thermal load of TRU waste streams for Fiscal Years 1999--2006. These data defined four major problem TRU waste streams. Estimates were also made of the volume expansion that would be required to meet the permissible wattages for all waste. The four waste streams defined were: (1) {sup 238}Pu-contaminated combustible waste from production of Radioactive Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) with {sup 238}Pu activity which exceeds allowable shipping limits by 10--100X. (2) {sup 241}Am-contaminated cement waste from plutonium recovery processes (nitric and hydrochloric acid recovery) are estimated to exceed thermal limits by {approximately}3X. (3) {sup 239}Pu-contaminated combustible waste, mainly organic waste materials contaminated with {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Am, is estimated to exceed thermal load requirements by a factor of {approximately}2X. (4) Oversized metal waste objects, (especially gloveboxes), cannot be shipped as is to WIPP because they will not fit in a standard waste box or drum.« less
  • This paper summarizes the methodology used to evaluate options for treatment of the remediated nitrate salt waste containers at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The method selected must enable treatment of the waste drums, which consist of a mixture of complex nitrate salts (oxidizer) improperly mixed with sWheat Scoop®1, an organic kitty litter and absorbent (fuel), in a manner that renders the waste safe, meets the specifications of waste acceptance criteria, and is suitable for transport and final disposal in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant located in Carlsbad, New Mexico. A Core Remediation Team was responsible for comprehensively reviewing the options,more » ensuring a robust, defensible treatment recommendation. The evaluation process consisted of two steps. First, a prescreening process was conducted to cull the list on the basis for a decision of feasibility of certain potential options with respect to the criteria. Then, the remaining potential options were evaluated and ranked against each of the criteria in a consistent methodology. Numerical scores were established by consensus of the review team. Finally, recommendations were developed based on current information and understanding of the scientific, technical, and regulatory situation. A discussion of the preferred options and documentation of the process used to reach the recommended treatment options are presented.« less
  • The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has assigned a continuing role to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in carrying out NNSA's national security mission. It is imperative that LANL continue this enduring responsibility and that NNSA adequately safeguard LANL capabilities. NNSA has identified the need to restrict vehicular access to certain areas within LANL for the purpose of permanently enhancing the physical security environment at LANL. It has also identified the need to change certain traffic flow patterns for the purpose of enhancing physical safety at LANL. The Proposed Action would include the construction of eastern and western bypass roadsmore » around the LANL Technical Area (TA) 3 area and the installation of vehicle access controls and related improvements to enhance security along Pajarito Road and in the LANL core area. This Proposed Action would modify the current roadway network and traffic patterns. It would also result in traversing Areas of Environmental Interest identified in the LANL Habitat Management Plan, demolition of part of an historic structure at Building 3-40, and traversing several potential release sites and part of the Los Alamos County landfill. The No Action Alternative was also considered. Under this alternative NNSA would not construct the eastern or western bypass roads, any access-control stations, or related improvements. Diamond Drive would continue to serve as the primary conduit for most vehicle traffic within the LANL core area regardless of actual trip destinations. The No Action Alternative does not meet NNSA's purpose and need for action. The proposed bypass road corridors traverse both developed and undeveloped areas. Several potential release sites are present. These would either be sampled and remediated in accordance with New Mexico Environment Department requirements before construction or avoided to allow for future remediation. In some cases, contaminant levels may fall below remediation thresholds and the Environmental Restoration Project would set requirements for workers. Structural bridges would be used to span canyons that are Areas of Environmental Interest because they include habitat for threatened and endangered species, or because they are 100-year floodplains or wetlands. Traffic congestion is not expected to increase once construction is completed. The Proposed Action would allow for a flexible approach to vehicle access controls in response to security conditions. Traffic safety within LANL would improve because access control would screen out drivers without a need to be in the LANL TA-3 area or along Pajarito Road. There would be adequate parking for University of California personnel and construction workers. Construction and demolition wastes would be transported to a licensed commercial landfill or recycled for other construction projects at LANL or offsite. Construction for the proposed bypass roads would be expected to produce only temporary and localized air and noise emissions. The Proposed Action would have no effects on visual resources, land use, socioeconomics, or environmental justice. The roadways would be designed to accommodate geologic and soil conditions. The demolition of part of Building 3-40 could have an adverse effect on historic structures since it is eligible for the National Register of Historic Places and, therefore, a treatment plan would be negotiated between NNSA and the State Historic Preservation Office.« less