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Title: UNIVERSITY PROGRAMS OF THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ADVANCED ACCELERATOR APPLICATIONS PROGRAM

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
788344
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-01-6110
TRN: US0200399
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Conference title not supplied, Conference location not supplied, Conference dates not supplied; Other Information: PBD: 1 Nov 2001
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; ACCELERATORS; USES; US DOE; EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES; COORDINATED RESEARCH PROGRAMS

Citation Formats

D. E. BELLER, T. E. WARD, and J. C. BRESEE. UNIVERSITY PROGRAMS OF THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ADVANCED ACCELERATOR APPLICATIONS PROGRAM. United States: N. p., 2001. Web.
D. E. BELLER, T. E. WARD, & J. C. BRESEE. UNIVERSITY PROGRAMS OF THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ADVANCED ACCELERATOR APPLICATIONS PROGRAM. United States.
D. E. BELLER, T. E. WARD, and J. C. BRESEE. Thu . "UNIVERSITY PROGRAMS OF THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ADVANCED ACCELERATOR APPLICATIONS PROGRAM". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/788344.
@article{osti_788344,
title = {UNIVERSITY PROGRAMS OF THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ADVANCED ACCELERATOR APPLICATIONS PROGRAM},
author = {D. E. BELLER and T. E. WARD and J. C. BRESEE},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2001},
month = {Thu Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2001}
}

Conference:
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