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Title: A METAMODEL-BASED APPROACH TO MODEL VALIDATION FOR NONLINEAR FINITE ELEMENT SIMULATIONS

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
788288
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-01-5870
TRN: US200202%%299
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Conference title not supplied, Conference location not supplied, Conference dates not supplied; Other Information: PBD: 1 Oct 2001
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; VALIDATION; NONLINEAR PROBLEMS; FINITE ELEMENT METHOD; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION

Citation Formats

S. W. DOEBLING, F. M. HEMEZ, and ET AL. A METAMODEL-BASED APPROACH TO MODEL VALIDATION FOR NONLINEAR FINITE ELEMENT SIMULATIONS. United States: N. p., 2001. Web.
S. W. DOEBLING, F. M. HEMEZ, & ET AL. A METAMODEL-BASED APPROACH TO MODEL VALIDATION FOR NONLINEAR FINITE ELEMENT SIMULATIONS. United States.
S. W. DOEBLING, F. M. HEMEZ, and ET AL. Mon . "A METAMODEL-BASED APPROACH TO MODEL VALIDATION FOR NONLINEAR FINITE ELEMENT SIMULATIONS". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/788288.
@article{osti_788288,
title = {A METAMODEL-BASED APPROACH TO MODEL VALIDATION FOR NONLINEAR FINITE ELEMENT SIMULATIONS},
author = {S. W. DOEBLING and F. M. HEMEZ and ET AL},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 2001},
month = {Mon Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 2001}
}

Conference:
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  • Abstract not provided.