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Title: THERMOACOUSTIC POWER SYSTEMS FOR SPACE APPLICATIONS

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
788284
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-01-5811
TRN: US200202%%297
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Conference title not supplied, Conference location not supplied, Conference dates not supplied; Other Information: PBD: 1 Oct 2001
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; 33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; POWER SYSTEMS; SPACE VEHICLES; ACOUSTICS; THERMODYNAMICS

Citation Formats

S. BACKHAUS, E. TOWARD, and M. PETACH. THERMOACOUSTIC POWER SYSTEMS FOR SPACE APPLICATIONS. United States: N. p., 2001. Web.
S. BACKHAUS, E. TOWARD, & M. PETACH. THERMOACOUSTIC POWER SYSTEMS FOR SPACE APPLICATIONS. United States.
S. BACKHAUS, E. TOWARD, and M. PETACH. Mon . "THERMOACOUSTIC POWER SYSTEMS FOR SPACE APPLICATIONS". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/788284.
@article{osti_788284,
title = {THERMOACOUSTIC POWER SYSTEMS FOR SPACE APPLICATIONS},
author = {S. BACKHAUS and E. TOWARD and M. PETACH},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 2001},
month = {Mon Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 2001}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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