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Title: NEAR-FIELD ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSION AROUND COMPLEX OBSTACLES USING A 3-D TURBULENT FLUID-FLOW MODEL

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
787066
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-99-2490
TRN: US200307%%615
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Conference title not supplied, Conference location not supplied, Conference dates not supplied; Other Information: PBD: 1 Nov 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; FLUID FLOW; FLOW MODELS; TURBULENT FLOW; COMPLEX TERRAIN; ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT; THREE-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS

Citation Formats

B. C. LETELLIER, and L. RESTREPO. NEAR-FIELD ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSION AROUND COMPLEX OBSTACLES USING A 3-D TURBULENT FLUID-FLOW MODEL. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
B. C. LETELLIER, & L. RESTREPO. NEAR-FIELD ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSION AROUND COMPLEX OBSTACLES USING A 3-D TURBULENT FLUID-FLOW MODEL. United States.
B. C. LETELLIER, and L. RESTREPO. 1999. "NEAR-FIELD ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSION AROUND COMPLEX OBSTACLES USING A 3-D TURBULENT FLUID-FLOW MODEL". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/787066.
@article{osti_787066,
title = {NEAR-FIELD ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSION AROUND COMPLEX OBSTACLES USING A 3-D TURBULENT FLUID-FLOW MODEL},
author = {B. C. LETELLIER and L. RESTREPO},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1999,
month =
}

Conference:
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