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Title: Innovation Approaches to Development and Ground Testing of Advanced Bimodal Space Power and Propulsion Systems

Abstract

The last major development effort for nuclear power and propulsion systems ended in 1993. Currently, there is not an initiative at either the National Aeronautical and Space Administration (NASA) or the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that requires the development of new nuclear power and propulsion systems. Studies continue to show nuclear technology as a strong technical candidate to lead the way toward human exploration of adjacent planets or provide power for deep space missions, particularly a 15,000 lbf bimodal nuclear system with 115 kW power capability. The development of nuclear technology for space applications would require technology development in some areas and a major flight qualification program. The last major ground test facility considered for nuclear propulsion qualification was the U.S. Air Force/DOE Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Project. Seven years have passed since that effort, and the questions remain the same, how to qualify nuclear power and propulsion systems for future space flight. It can be reasonably assumed that much of the nuclear testing required to qualify a nuclear system for space application will be performed at DOE facilities as demonstrated by the Nuclear Rocket Engine Reactor Experiment (NERVA) and Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) programs. The nuclear infrastructuremore » to support testing in this country is aging and getting smaller, though facilities still exist to support many of the technology development needs. By renewing efforts, an innovative approach to qualifying these systems through the use of existing facilities either in the U.S. (DOE's Advance Test Reactor, High Flux Irradiation Facility and the Contained Test Facility) or overseas should be possible.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. (INEEL)
  2. (NASA Glenn Research Center)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
786688
Report Number(s):
INEEL/CON-2000-01020
TRN: US0201214
DOE Contract Number:  
AC07-99ID13727
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 36th AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint Propulsion Conference, Conference location not supplied, 07/16/2000--07/19/2000; Other Information: PBD: 14 Jul 2000
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; AGING; EXPLORATION; IRRADIATION; NASA; NUCLEAR POWER; PLANETS; PROPULSION; PROPULSION SYSTEMS; ROCKET ENGINES; SPACE FLIGHT; TEST REACTORS; NESDPS Office of Nuclear Energy Space and Defense Power Systems; NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY

Citation Formats

Hill, T., Noble, C., Martinell, J., and Borowski, S. Innovation Approaches to Development and Ground Testing of Advanced Bimodal Space Power and Propulsion Systems. United States: N. p., 2000. Web.
Hill, T., Noble, C., Martinell, J., & Borowski, S. Innovation Approaches to Development and Ground Testing of Advanced Bimodal Space Power and Propulsion Systems. United States.
Hill, T., Noble, C., Martinell, J., and Borowski, S. Fri . "Innovation Approaches to Development and Ground Testing of Advanced Bimodal Space Power and Propulsion Systems". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/786688.
@article{osti_786688,
title = {Innovation Approaches to Development and Ground Testing of Advanced Bimodal Space Power and Propulsion Systems},
author = {Hill, T. and Noble, C. and Martinell, J. and Borowski, S.},
abstractNote = {The last major development effort for nuclear power and propulsion systems ended in 1993. Currently, there is not an initiative at either the National Aeronautical and Space Administration (NASA) or the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that requires the development of new nuclear power and propulsion systems. Studies continue to show nuclear technology as a strong technical candidate to lead the way toward human exploration of adjacent planets or provide power for deep space missions, particularly a 15,000 lbf bimodal nuclear system with 115 kW power capability. The development of nuclear technology for space applications would require technology development in some areas and a major flight qualification program. The last major ground test facility considered for nuclear propulsion qualification was the U.S. Air Force/DOE Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Project. Seven years have passed since that effort, and the questions remain the same, how to qualify nuclear power and propulsion systems for future space flight. It can be reasonably assumed that much of the nuclear testing required to qualify a nuclear system for space application will be performed at DOE facilities as demonstrated by the Nuclear Rocket Engine Reactor Experiment (NERVA) and Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) programs. The nuclear infrastructure to support testing in this country is aging and getting smaller, though facilities still exist to support many of the technology development needs. By renewing efforts, an innovative approach to qualifying these systems through the use of existing facilities either in the U.S. (DOE's Advance Test Reactor, High Flux Irradiation Facility and the Contained Test Facility) or overseas should be possible.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jul 14 00:00:00 EDT 2000},
month = {Fri Jul 14 00:00:00 EDT 2000}
}

Conference:
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