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Title: NEW ANION-EXCHANGE RESINS FOR IMPROVED SEPARATIONS OF NUCLEAR MATERIALS

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
786268
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-99-2910
TRN: US0200031
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Conference title not supplied, Conference location not supplied, Conference dates not supplied; Other Information: PBD: 1 Nov 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; RESINS; ION EXCHANGE MATERIALS; RADIOACTIVE WASTE PROCESSING; SEPARATION PROCESSES

Citation Formats

M. E. BARR, G. JARVINEN, and ET AL. NEW ANION-EXCHANGE RESINS FOR IMPROVED SEPARATIONS OF NUCLEAR MATERIALS. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
M. E. BARR, G. JARVINEN, & ET AL. NEW ANION-EXCHANGE RESINS FOR IMPROVED SEPARATIONS OF NUCLEAR MATERIALS. United States.
M. E. BARR, G. JARVINEN, and ET AL. 1999. "NEW ANION-EXCHANGE RESINS FOR IMPROVED SEPARATIONS OF NUCLEAR MATERIALS". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/786268.
@article{osti_786268,
title = {NEW ANION-EXCHANGE RESINS FOR IMPROVED SEPARATIONS OF NUCLEAR MATERIALS},
author = {M. E. BARR and G. JARVINEN and ET AL},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1999,
month =
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • 'The authors are developing multi-functional anion-exchange resins that facilitate anion uptake by carefully controlling the structure of the anion receptor site. The new ion-exchange resins interface the rapidly developing field of ion-specific chelating ligands with robust, commercial ion exchange technology. The overall objective of the research is to develop a predictive capability which allows the facile design and implementation of multi-functionalized anion exchange materials which selectively sorb metal complexes of interest from targeted process, waste, and environmental streams. The basic scientific issues addressed are actinide complex speciation along with modeling of the metal complex/functional site interactions in order to determinemore » optimal binding-site characteristics. Their approach uses a thorough determination of the chemical species both in solution and as bound to the resin to determine the characteristics of resin active sites which can actively facilitate specific metal-complex sorption to the resin. The first year milestones were designed to allow us to build off of their extensive expertise with plutonium in nitrate solutions prior to investigating other, less familiar systems. While the principle investigators have successfully developed actinide chelators and ion-exchange materials in the past, the authors were fully aware that integration of this two fields would be challenging, rewarding and, at times, highly frustrating. Relatively small differences in the substrate (cross-linkage, impurities), the active sites (percent substitution, physical accessibility), the actinide solution (oxidation state changes, purity) and the analytical procedures (low detection limits) can produce inconsistent sorption behavior which is difficult to interpret. The potential paybacks for success, however, are enormous. They feel that they have learned a great deal about how to control these numerous variables to produce consistent, reliable analysis of actinide sorption behavior with the new and baseline anion-exchange materials. The four Year 1 (FY97) milestones are listed below along with an update on the progress towards their completion.'« less
  • 'The overall objective of this research is to develop a predictive capability which allows the facile design and implementation of multi-functionalized anion-exchange materials which selectively sorb metal complexes of interest from targeted process, waste, and environmental streams. The basic scientific issues addressed are actinide complex speciation along with modeling of the metal complex/functional-site interactions in order to determine optimal binding-site characteristics. The new ion-exchange resins interface the rapidly developing field of ion-specific chelating ligands with robust, commercial ion-exchange technology. Various Focus Areas and Crosscutting Programs have described needs that would be favorably impacted by the new materials: Efficient Separations andmore » Processing; Plutonium; Plumes; Mixed Waste; High-Level Tank Waste. Sites within the DOE complex which would benefit from the improved anion-exchange technology include Hanford, INEL, Los Alamos, Oak Ridge, and Savannah River. As of April 1998, this report summarizes work after 1.6 years of a 3-year project. The authors technical approach combines empirical testing with theoretical modeling (applied in an iterative mode) in order to determine optimal binding-site characteristics. They determine actinide-complex speciation in specific media, then develop models for the metal complex/functional-site interactions Synthesis and evaluation of multi-functionalized extractants and ion-exchange materials that implement key features of the optimized binding site provide feedback to the modeling and design activities. Resin materials which actively facilitate the uptake of actinide complexes from solution should display both improved selectivity and kinetic properties. The implementation of the bifunctionality concept involves N-derivatization of pyridinium units from a base poly(4-vinylpyridine) resin with a second cationic site such that the two anion-exchange sites are linked by spacer arms of varying length and flexibility.'« less
  • Improved separations of nuclear materials will have a significant impact upon a broad range of DOE activities. DOE-EM Focus Areas and Crosscutting Programs have identified improved methods for the extraction and recovery of radioactive metal ions from process, waste, and environmental waters as critical needs for the coming years. We propose to develop multifunctional anion-exchange resins that facilitate anion uptake by carefully controlling the structure of the anion receptor site. Our new ion-exchange resins interface the field of ion-specific chelating ligands with robust, commercial ion-exchange technology to provide materials which exhibit superior selectivity and kinetics of sorption and desorption. Themore » following Focus Areas and Crosscutting Programs have described needs that would be favorably impacted by the new material: Efficient Separations and Processing - radionuclide removal from aqueous phases; Plutonium - Pu, Am or total alpha removal to meet regulatory requirement s before discharge to the environment; Plumes - U and Tc in groundwater, U, Pu, Am, and Tc in soils; Mixed Waste - radionuclide partitioning; High-Level Tank Waste - actinide and Tc removal from supernatants and/or sludges. The basic scientific issues which need to be addressed are actinide complex speciation along with modeling of metal complex/functional site interactions in order to determine optimal binding-site characteristics. Synthesis of multifunctionalized extractants and ion-exchange materials that implement key features of the optimized binding site, and testing of these materials, will provide feedback to the modeling and design activities. Resin materials which actively facilitate the uptake of actinide complexes from solution should display both improved selectivity and kinetic properties. The long-range implications of this research, however, go far beyond the nuclear complex. This new methodology of ''facilitated uptake'' could revolutionize ion-exchange technology, allowing this robust, inexpensive procedure to attain unprecedented levels of ion affinity and selectivity.« less
  • We are developing multi-functional anion-exchange resins that facilitate anion uptake by carefully controlling the structure of the anion receptor site. We are attempting to determine if the precepts of ''bite size,'' ''preorganization,'' and ''bidentate'' have an appreciable impact upon electrostatic bonding as they do for covalent bonding. If these precepts do have a positive impact, we will develop new ion-exchange resins that interface the rapidly developing field of ion-specific chelating ligands with robust, commercial ion-exchange technology. The overall objective of our research is to develop a predictive capability that will enable us to design and implement multi-functionalized anion-exchange materials whichmore » selectively sorb metal complexes of interest from targeted process, waste, and environmental streams. The following Focus Areas and Crosscutting Programs have described needs that would be favorably impacted by the new materials: Efficient Separations and Processing - radionuclide removal (Pu, U, Am) from aqueous phases Plutonium - Pu, Am or total alpha removal to <30 pCi/L before discharge to the environment Plumes - U and Tc in groundwater; U, Pu, Am, and Tc in soils Mixed Waste - radionuclide partitioning High-Level Tank Waste - actinide and Tc removal from supernatants and/or sludges« less
  • We are developing bifunctional anion-exchange resins that facilitate anion uptake by carefully controlling the structure of the anion receptor site. Our new ion-exchange resins interface the rapidly developing field of ion-specific chelating ligands with robust, commercial ion-exchange technology. The basic scientific issues addressed are actinide complex speciation along with modeling of the metal complex/functional site interactions in order to determine optimal binding site characteristics. Resin materials that actively facilitate the uptake of actinide complexes from solution should display both improved selectivity and kinetic properties. Our implementation of the 'bifunctionality concept' involves N-derivatization of pyridinium units from a base poly(4- vinylpyridine)more » resin (PVP) with a second cationic site, such that the two anion-exchange sites are linked by 'spacer' arms of varying length and flexibility. The overall objective of our research is to develop a predictive capability that allows the facile design and implementation of multi-functionalized anion-exchange materials to selectively sorb metal complexes of interest from targeted process, waste, and environmental streams. Various Focus Areas and Crosscutting Programs have described needs that would be favorably impacted by the new materials:Tanks, Plutonium; Subsurface Contaminants; Mixed Waste; and Efficient Separations. Sites within the DOE complex which would benefit from the improved anion exchange technology include Hanford, Idaho, Los Alamos, Oak Ridge, and Savannah River.« less