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Title: Fusion Propulsion Systems for Rapid Interplanetary and Interstellar Missions

Abstract

Two fusion schemes whose underlying physics is reasonably well understood are shown to form the basis of propulsion systems that could be used for interstellar exploration in the early part of the next century. The first, a magnetic confinement concept known as gas-dynamic mirror (GDM), generates a specific impulse of 1.3 x 10{sup 5}s and a thrust of 2.52 x 10{sup 3}N and can make the 10 000-AU one-way journey in {approx}42 yr. The other, referred to as magnetically insulated inertial confinement fusion (MICF), is a pulsed inertial fusion system that generates a specific impulse of 1.74 x 10{sup 5} and a thrust of {approx}6 x 10{sup 4} and can make the same mission in {approx}29 yr.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
none (US)
OSTI Identifier:
786217
Report Number(s):
ISSN 0003-018X; CODEN TANSAO
ISSN 0003-018X; CODEN TANSAO; TRN: US0109309
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 2000 Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA (US), 06/04/2000--06/08/2000; Other Information: Transactions of the American Nuclear Society, Volume 82; PBD: 4 Jun 2000
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; 70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; EXPLORATION; INERTIAL CONFINEMENT; MAGNETIC CONFINEMENT; SPACE PROPULSION REACTORS; THERMONUCLEAR REACTORS; SPACE FLIGHT; INTERPLANETARY SPACE; INTERSTELLAR SPACE

Citation Formats

Terry Kammash. Fusion Propulsion Systems for Rapid Interplanetary and Interstellar Missions. United States: N. p., 2000. Web.
Terry Kammash. Fusion Propulsion Systems for Rapid Interplanetary and Interstellar Missions. United States.
Terry Kammash. Sun . "Fusion Propulsion Systems for Rapid Interplanetary and Interstellar Missions". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_786217,
title = {Fusion Propulsion Systems for Rapid Interplanetary and Interstellar Missions},
author = {Terry Kammash},
abstractNote = {Two fusion schemes whose underlying physics is reasonably well understood are shown to form the basis of propulsion systems that could be used for interstellar exploration in the early part of the next century. The first, a magnetic confinement concept known as gas-dynamic mirror (GDM), generates a specific impulse of 1.3 x 10{sup 5}s and a thrust of 2.52 x 10{sup 3}N and can make the 10 000-AU one-way journey in {approx}42 yr. The other, referred to as magnetically insulated inertial confinement fusion (MICF), is a pulsed inertial fusion system that generates a specific impulse of 1.74 x 10{sup 5} and a thrust of {approx}6 x 10{sup 4} and can make the same mission in {approx}29 yr.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jun 04 00:00:00 EDT 2000},
month = {Sun Jun 04 00:00:00 EDT 2000}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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