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Title: Development of Three-Dimensional Position-Sensitive Room Temperature Semiconductor Gamma-Ray Spectrometers

Abstract

Semiconductor detectors can provide better spectroscopic performance than scintillation or gas-filled detectors because of the small ionization energy required to generate each electron-hole pair. Indeed, cryogenically cooled high-purity germanium detectors have played the dominant role whenever the best gamma-ray spectroscopy is required. A decades-long search for other semiconductor detectors that could provide higher stopping power and could operate at room temperature has been ongoing. Wide-bandgap semiconductors, such as CdTe, CdZnTe, and HgI{sub 2}, have captured the most attention. However, the use of these semiconductors in detectors has been hindered primarily by problems of charge trapping and material nonuniformity. Introduced in 1994, single-polarity charge sensing on semiconductor detectors has shown great promise in avoiding the hole-trapping problem, and the newly demonstrated three-dimensional position-sensing technique can significantly mitigate the degradation of energy resolution due to nonuniformity of detector material. In addition, three-dimensional position sensitivity will provide unique imaging capabilities of these gamma-ray spectrometers. These devices are of interest for nuclear nonproliferation, medical imaging, gamma-ray astronomy, and high-energy physics applications. This paper describes the three-dimensional position-sensing method and reports our latest results using second-generation three-dimensional position-sensitive semiconductor spectrometers.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
none (US)
OSTI Identifier:
786120
Report Number(s):
ISSN 0003-018X; CODEN TANSAO
ISSN 0003-018X; CODEN TANSAO; TRN: US0109290
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 2000 Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA (US), 06/04/2000--06/08/2000; Other Information: Transactions of the American Nuclear Society, Volume 82; PBD: 4 Jun 2000
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; ENERGY RESOLUTION; SEMICONDUCTOR DETECTORS; GAMMA SPECTROMETERS; GAMMA SPECTROSCOPY; POSITION SENSITIVE DETECTORS; PERFORMANCE

Citation Formats

Zhong He, Wen Li, Glenn F. Knoll, and D. K. Wehe. Development of Three-Dimensional Position-Sensitive Room Temperature Semiconductor Gamma-Ray Spectrometers. United States: N. p., 2000. Web.
Zhong He, Wen Li, Glenn F. Knoll, & D. K. Wehe. Development of Three-Dimensional Position-Sensitive Room Temperature Semiconductor Gamma-Ray Spectrometers. United States.
Zhong He, Wen Li, Glenn F. Knoll, and D. K. Wehe. Sun . "Development of Three-Dimensional Position-Sensitive Room Temperature Semiconductor Gamma-Ray Spectrometers". United States.
@article{osti_786120,
title = {Development of Three-Dimensional Position-Sensitive Room Temperature Semiconductor Gamma-Ray Spectrometers},
author = {Zhong He and Wen Li and Glenn F. Knoll and D. K. Wehe},
abstractNote = {Semiconductor detectors can provide better spectroscopic performance than scintillation or gas-filled detectors because of the small ionization energy required to generate each electron-hole pair. Indeed, cryogenically cooled high-purity germanium detectors have played the dominant role whenever the best gamma-ray spectroscopy is required. A decades-long search for other semiconductor detectors that could provide higher stopping power and could operate at room temperature has been ongoing. Wide-bandgap semiconductors, such as CdTe, CdZnTe, and HgI{sub 2}, have captured the most attention. However, the use of these semiconductors in detectors has been hindered primarily by problems of charge trapping and material nonuniformity. Introduced in 1994, single-polarity charge sensing on semiconductor detectors has shown great promise in avoiding the hole-trapping problem, and the newly demonstrated three-dimensional position-sensing technique can significantly mitigate the degradation of energy resolution due to nonuniformity of detector material. In addition, three-dimensional position sensitivity will provide unique imaging capabilities of these gamma-ray spectrometers. These devices are of interest for nuclear nonproliferation, medical imaging, gamma-ray astronomy, and high-energy physics applications. This paper describes the three-dimensional position-sensing method and reports our latest results using second-generation three-dimensional position-sensitive semiconductor spectrometers.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {6}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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