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Title: MINING ASSOCIATIVE RELATIONS FROM WEBSITE LOGS AND THEIR APPLICATION TO CONTEXT-DEPENDENT RETRIEVAL USING SPREADING ACTIVATION

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
786012
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-99-3391
TRN: US200306%%34
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Conference title not supplied, Conference location not supplied, Conference dates not supplied; Other Information: PBD: 1 Jul 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; INTERNET; INFORMATION RETRIEVAL; DATA ANALYSIS

Citation Formats

J. BOLLEN, H / VAN DE SOMPEL, and L. M. ROCHA. MINING ASSOCIATIVE RELATIONS FROM WEBSITE LOGS AND THEIR APPLICATION TO CONTEXT-DEPENDENT RETRIEVAL USING SPREADING ACTIVATION. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
J. BOLLEN, H / VAN DE SOMPEL, & L. M. ROCHA. MINING ASSOCIATIVE RELATIONS FROM WEBSITE LOGS AND THEIR APPLICATION TO CONTEXT-DEPENDENT RETRIEVAL USING SPREADING ACTIVATION. United States.
J. BOLLEN, H / VAN DE SOMPEL, and L. M. ROCHA. 1999. "MINING ASSOCIATIVE RELATIONS FROM WEBSITE LOGS AND THEIR APPLICATION TO CONTEXT-DEPENDENT RETRIEVAL USING SPREADING ACTIVATION". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/786012.
@article{osti_786012,
title = {MINING ASSOCIATIVE RELATIONS FROM WEBSITE LOGS AND THEIR APPLICATION TO CONTEXT-DEPENDENT RETRIEVAL USING SPREADING ACTIVATION},
author = {J. BOLLEN and H / VAN DE SOMPEL and L. M. ROCHA},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1999,
month = 7
}

Conference:
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