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Title: MODELING SHOCK RECOVERY EXPERIMENTS OF SANDSTONE

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
786010
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-99-3353
TRN: US200201%%40
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Conference title not supplied, Conference location not supplied, Conference dates not supplied; Other Information: PBD: 1 Jul 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; SANDSTONES; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; IMPACT SHOCK; IMPACT TESTS; RESPONSE FUNCTIONS

Citation Formats

C. R. HAGELBERG, R. P. SWIFT, and ET AL. MODELING SHOCK RECOVERY EXPERIMENTS OF SANDSTONE. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
C. R. HAGELBERG, R. P. SWIFT, & ET AL. MODELING SHOCK RECOVERY EXPERIMENTS OF SANDSTONE. United States.
C. R. HAGELBERG, R. P. SWIFT, and ET AL. 1999. "MODELING SHOCK RECOVERY EXPERIMENTS OF SANDSTONE". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/786010.
@article{osti_786010,
title = {MODELING SHOCK RECOVERY EXPERIMENTS OF SANDSTONE},
author = {C. R. HAGELBERG and R. P. SWIFT and ET AL},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1999,
month = 7
}

Conference:
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  • Shock-recovery experiments have been performed on Berea Sandstone under dry and water-saturated conditions using a single-stage light-gas gun. Stress levels in the range between 3.1 and 9.8 GPa were achieved by impacting projectiles in a recovery fixture. The microstructural damage of the shocked samples were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), laser particle analysis and X-ray computed micro tomography (XCMT). The dry samples show strongly and irregularly fragmented quartz grains with an considerably reduced porosity. In contrast, the water-saturated specimens have less grain damage and higher porosity. The water in the pores distributes the stresses which reduce the contact forcemore » between the grains during the shock compression. The dynamic fragmentation of the grain-grain interactions was modeled by explicitly treating the grain-pore structure using the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic (SPH) computational method. This is a continuum Lagrangian gridless approach that features particles.« less
  • Recovery experiments on porous PZT 95/5 ferroelectric have been performed on a single-stage compressed gas gun over the stress range of 0.3 to 4.6 GPa. Density measurements on the recovered specimens suggest permanent pore compaction. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that the shock-induced FE to AFE phase transformation is reversible, with a reduction in the residual lattice strain compared with the unshocked material. SEM and TEM microscopy show evidence of ferroelectric domains with fewer numbers at the higher stress. The microstructure of the 3.0 GPa sample is significantly affected as evidenced by dislocation slip bands and oval shaped voids.
  • Systematic shock recovery experiments, in which microstructural and mechanical property effects are characterized quantitatively, constitute an important means of increasing our understanding of shock processes. Through studies of the effects of variations in metallurgical and shock loading parameters on structure/property relationships, the micromechanisms of shock deformation, and how they differ from conventional strain rate processes, are beginning to emerge. This paper will highlight the state-of-the-art in shock recovery of metallic and ceramic materials. Techniques will be described which are utilized to ''soft'' recover shock-loaded metallic samples possessing low residual strain; crucial to accurate ''post-mortem'' metallurgical investigations of the influence ofmore » shock loading on material behavior. Illustrations of the influence of shock assembly design on the structure/property relationships in shock-recovered copper samples including such issues as residual strain and contact stresses, and their consequences are discussed. Shock recovery techniques used on brittle materials will be reviewed and discussed in light of recent experimental results. Finally, shock recovery structure/property results and VISAR data on the /alpha/--/omega/ shock-induced phase transition in titanium will be used to illustrate the beneficial link between shock recovery and ''real-time'' shock data. 26 refs., 3 figs.« less
  • An ideal shock recovery experiment would be to subject a sample material to a single, well-defined shock followed by a controlled, benign release of the stresses and velocities generated. The process should be such that any change found in the sample after recovery could be attributed to the shock process alone. In any real experiment with finite-sized samples, rarefaction waves are generated at the edges of the sample. In general these rarefaction waves can have a large effect on the sample, which is impossible to separate from the effects of the shock alone. It has been suggested that samples ofmore » certain shapes will have a small region in their interiors, which is substantially free from the effects of edge rarefactions. We will present the results of three-dimensional computer calculations done to test this hypothesis.« less