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Title: Main Injector LCW (Low Conductivity Water) control system

Abstract

There are six service buildings (MI-10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60) uniformly spaced along the perimeter of the MI (Main Injector). Each building supplies power and cooling water to 1,815 feet of circumference in the MI. A total of 18 LCW pumps were installed around the ring with 3 pumps per building. Each pump has a 100hp motor and delivers 550 GPM of LCW. Approximately 8,000 GPM of LCW is required to cool magnets, bus and power supplies in the MI enclosure and service buildings. The 18 centrifugal pumps are capable of delivering approximately 9.900 GPM of LCW. At each service building, the temperature of LCW is regulated to 95 +/-1 degF by a 3-way control valve which diverts a portion of LCW around a heat exchanger when less cooling is required. A constant flow of pond water is circulated in the tube side of the heat exchanger to remove the heat. In each service building, an LCW control system controls pumps and valves, and it monitors pressures, flows, resistivities and temperatures. The control system also communicates with other buildings including MCR (Main Control Room) via an Ethernet link and front-end computers. In the MI-60 service building, the magnetmore » LCW control system controls/monitors a 3,000 gallon storage/expansion tank in addition to what's done in the other service buildings. In MI-60, there are two additional LCW control systems for 95 degF RF and RF Cavities. In MI-40, there is an LCW control subsystem, which is attached to the MI-40 main system, and which controls/monitors the Beam Dump cooling system. In MI-52, there is an LCW control system for 150 Gev Proton Line. In CUB (Central Utility Building), there are two control systems (US Filter and Fermilab). The US Filter system controls the regeneration of DI (Deionization) columns, and the Fermilab system manipulates valves to fill the Tev (Tevatron) and MI rings with good LCW.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
7858
Report Number(s):
FERMILAB-TM-2085
ON: DE00007858
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-76CH03000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
66 PHYSICS; 43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; Beam Injection; Water Supply; Control Systems

Citation Formats

Seino, K C. Main Injector LCW (Low Conductivity Water) control system. United States: N. p., 1999. Web. doi:10.2172/7858.
Seino, K C. Main Injector LCW (Low Conductivity Water) control system. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/7858
Seino, K C. 1999. "Main Injector LCW (Low Conductivity Water) control system". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/7858. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/7858.
@article{osti_7858,
title = {Main Injector LCW (Low Conductivity Water) control system},
author = {Seino, K C},
abstractNote = {There are six service buildings (MI-10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60) uniformly spaced along the perimeter of the MI (Main Injector). Each building supplies power and cooling water to 1,815 feet of circumference in the MI. A total of 18 LCW pumps were installed around the ring with 3 pumps per building. Each pump has a 100hp motor and delivers 550 GPM of LCW. Approximately 8,000 GPM of LCW is required to cool magnets, bus and power supplies in the MI enclosure and service buildings. The 18 centrifugal pumps are capable of delivering approximately 9.900 GPM of LCW. At each service building, the temperature of LCW is regulated to 95 +/-1 degF by a 3-way control valve which diverts a portion of LCW around a heat exchanger when less cooling is required. A constant flow of pond water is circulated in the tube side of the heat exchanger to remove the heat. In each service building, an LCW control system controls pumps and valves, and it monitors pressures, flows, resistivities and temperatures. The control system also communicates with other buildings including MCR (Main Control Room) via an Ethernet link and front-end computers. In the MI-60 service building, the magnet LCW control system controls/monitors a 3,000 gallon storage/expansion tank in addition to what's done in the other service buildings. In MI-60, there are two additional LCW control systems for 95 degF RF and RF Cavities. In MI-40, there is an LCW control subsystem, which is attached to the MI-40 main system, and which controls/monitors the Beam Dump cooling system. In MI-52, there is an LCW control system for 150 Gev Proton Line. In CUB (Central Utility Building), there are two control systems (US Filter and Fermilab). The US Filter system controls the regeneration of DI (Deionization) columns, and the Fermilab system manipulates valves to fill the Tev (Tevatron) and MI rings with good LCW.},
doi = {10.2172/7858},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/7858}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {6}
}