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Title: LASER-DRIVEN MINIFLYER INDUCED GOLD SPALL

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
785433
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-99-3280
TRN: US0302424
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Conference title not supplied, Conference location not supplied, Conference dates not supplied; Other Information: PBD: 1 Jul 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; GOLD; LASER RADIATION; SPALLATION; LASERS; DESIGN

Citation Formats

D. L. ROBBINS, R. J. GEHR, and ET AL. LASER-DRIVEN MINIFLYER INDUCED GOLD SPALL. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
D. L. ROBBINS, R. J. GEHR, & ET AL. LASER-DRIVEN MINIFLYER INDUCED GOLD SPALL. United States.
D. L. ROBBINS, R. J. GEHR, and ET AL. 1999. "LASER-DRIVEN MINIFLYER INDUCED GOLD SPALL". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/785433.
@article{osti_785433,
title = {LASER-DRIVEN MINIFLYER INDUCED GOLD SPALL},
author = {D. L. ROBBINS and R. J. GEHR and ET AL},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1999,
month = 7
}

Conference:
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  • No abstract prepared.
  • The laser-driven miniflyer has been developed as a small-sized complement to the propellant or gas-driven gun with which to make material property measurements. Flyer velocities typically range from 0.5 to 1.5 km/s, depending on the energy of the launching laser and the flyer dimensions. The 10--50 {micro}m-thick flyers, 1--3 mm in diameter, and comparably small targets require very little material and are easy to recover for post-experiment analysis. To measure and improve the precision of the measurements, the authors are conducting an extensive series of experiments impacting well-characterized Cu, Al, and Au on several transparent, calibrated, windows (PMMA, LiF, andmore » sapphire). Measurement of the impact and interface velocities with a high-time-resolution velocity interferometer (VISAR) gives them a point on the Hugoniot of the flyer material. These are then compared to published Hugoniot data taken with conventional techniques. In the spall experiments, a flyer strikes a somewhat thicker target of the same material and creates a spall in the target. Measuring the free-surface velocity of the target gives information on the compressive elastic-plastic response of the target to the impact, the tensile spall strength, and the strain rate at which the spall occurred. Volumetric strain rates at spall in these experiments are frequently in the 10{sup 6}--10{sup 8} s{sup {minus}1} range, considerably higher than the 10{sup 3}--10{sup 4} s{sup {minus}1} range obtainable from gas gun experiments.« less
  • The laser-driven miniflyer has been developed as a small-sized complement to the propellant- or gas-driven gun with which to make material property measurements. Flyer velocities typically range from 0.5 to 1.5 km/s, depending on the energy of the launching laser and the flyer dimensions. The 10{endash}50 {mu}m-thick flyers, 1{endash}3 mm in diameter, and comparably small targets require very little material and are easy to recover for post-experiment analysis. To measure and improve the precision of our measurements, we are conducting an extensive series of experiments impacting well-characterized Cu, Al, and Au on several transparent, calibrated, windows (PMMA, LiF, and sapphire).more » Measurement of the impact and interface velocities with a high-time-resolution velocity interferometer (VISAR) gives us a point on the Hugoniot of the flyer material. These are then compared to published Hugoniot data taken with conventional techniques. In the spall experiments, a flyer strikes a somewhat thicker target of the same material and creates a spall in the target. Measuring the free-surface velocity of the target gives information on the compressive elastic-plastic response of the target to the impact, the tensile spall strength, and the strain rate at which the spall occurred. Volumetric strain rates at spall in these experiments are frequently in the 10{sup 6}{endash}10{sup 8}s{sup {minus}1} range, considerably higher than the 10{sup 3}{endash}10{sup 4}s{sup {minus}1} range obtainable from gas gun experiments. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}« less
  • The laser-driven MiniFlyer system is used to launch a small, thin flyer plate for impact on a target. Consequently, it is an indirect drive technique that de-couples the shock from the laser beam profile. The flyer velocity can be controlled by adjustment of the laser energy. The upper limits on the flyer velocity involve the ability of the substrate window to transmit the laser light without absorbing, reflecting, etc.; i.e., a maximum amount of laser energy is directly converted into kinetic energy of the flyer plate. We have investigated the use of sapphire, quartz, and BK-7 glass as substrate windows.more » In the past, a particular type of sapphire has been used for nearly all MiniFlyer experiments. Results of this study in terms of the performance of these window materials, based on flyer velocity, are discussed.« less
  • No abstract prepared.