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Title: OBJECT-ORIENTED PROCESS DOSE MODELING FOR GLOVEBOX OPERATIONS

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
785424
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-99-3230
TRN: US0302042
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Conference title not supplied, Conference location not supplied, Conference dates not supplied; Other Information: PBD: 1 Jul 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; GLOVEBOXES; RADIATION DOSES; MATHEMATICAL MODELS

Citation Formats

S. T. BOERIGTER, J. H. FASEL, and D. E. KORNREICH. OBJECT-ORIENTED PROCESS DOSE MODELING FOR GLOVEBOX OPERATIONS. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
S. T. BOERIGTER, J. H. FASEL, & D. E. KORNREICH. OBJECT-ORIENTED PROCESS DOSE MODELING FOR GLOVEBOX OPERATIONS. United States.
S. T. BOERIGTER, J. H. FASEL, and D. E. KORNREICH. Thu . "OBJECT-ORIENTED PROCESS DOSE MODELING FOR GLOVEBOX OPERATIONS". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/785424.
@article{osti_785424,
title = {OBJECT-ORIENTED PROCESS DOSE MODELING FOR GLOVEBOX OPERATIONS},
author = {S. T. BOERIGTER and J. H. FASEL and D. E. KORNREICH},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 1999},
month = {Thu Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 1999}
}

Conference:
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  • The Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory supports several defense and nondefense-related missions for the country by performing fabrication, surveillance, and research and development for materials and components that contain plutonium. Most operations occur in rooms with one or more arrays of gloveboxes connected to each other via trolley gloveboxes. Minimizing the effective dose equivalent (EDE) is a growing concern as a result of steadily declining allowable dose limits being imposed and a growing general awareness of safety in the workplace. In general, the authors discriminate three components of a worker`s total EDE: the primary EDE, the secondary EDE,more » and background EDE. A particular background source of interest is the nuclear materials vault. The distinction between sources inside and outside of a particular room is arbitrary with the underlying assumption that building walls and floors provide significant shielding to justify including sources in other rooms in the background category. Los Alamos has developed the Process Modeling System (ProMoS) primarily for performing process analyses of nuclear operations. ProMoS is an object-oriented, discrete-event simulation package that has been used to analyze operations at Los Alamos and proposed facilities such as the new fabrication facilities for the Complex-21 effort. In the past, crude estimates of the process dose (the EDE received when a particular process occurred), room dose (the EDE received when a particular process occurred in a given room), and facility dose (the EDE received when a particular process occurred in the facility) were used to obtain an integrated EDE for a given process. Modifications to the ProMoS package were made to utilize secondary dose information to use dose modeling to enhance the process modeling efforts.« less
  • The Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) supports several defense- and non-defense-related missions for the country by performing fabrication, surveillance, and research and development for materials and components that contain plutonium. Most operations occur in rooms with one or more arrays of glove boxes connected to each other via trolley glove boxes. Each room may contain glove boxes dedicated to several different operations or functions. Minimizing the effective dose equivalent (EDE) is a growing concern as a result of steadily allowable dose limits being imposed and a growing general awareness of safety in the workplace. In general, themore » authors discriminate three components of a worker's total EDE: the primary EDE, the secondary EDE, and background EDE. The immediate sources to which a worker is exposed provide the primary EDE. The secondary EDE results from operations and sources in the same vicinity or room as the worker. The background EDE results from all other sources of radiation, such as natural sources and sources outside of the room. A particular background source of interest is the nuclear materials vault. The distinction between sources inside and outside of a particular room is arbitrary with the underlying assumption that building walls and floors provide significant shielding to justify including sources in other rooms in the background category. An associated paper details the tool that they use to determine the primary and secondary EDEs for all processes of interest in a room containing glove boxes.« less
  • Mathematical and expert system models are being used extensively for mineral process engineering; nevertheless, standardized methodologies for their computer implementation do not exist. In meeting this need, this paper introduces the concept of a process software model, or more specifically an object-oriented software model, and presents a detailed methodology for its development involving software model specification and development. These software models provide a formal basis for the subsequent design and construction of software objects corresponding to the real world process objects.
  • Nuclear analytical chemistry/materials characterization operations at Los Alamos support many programs related to national security. These operations work with a wide range of material masses (microgram to tens of grams) and several forms (metal, oxide, and liquid). We have used detailed flowsheets for the chemistry and characterization functions to construct a process model of the facility operations. The model, constructed with the commercially available package ExtendTMt,r acks material amounts and forms through the process of sample receiving through data return. The model calculates equipment utilization, throughput, and turnaroundtime, as well as the material-at-risk and source term as a function ofmore » time for facility safety analyses. We see that the source-term is highly dependent on the material holding time, as expected; thus, proper material management policies are essential to operating a facility within regulatory guidelines regarding material-at-risk. In addition, we see that segregation of operations based on the material used can be beneficial to the overall operations.« less