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Title: MODELING A NATIVE AMERICAN RUIN: DETERMINATION OF AN UPPER-BOUND EARTHQUAKE AT LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
785412
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-00-2561
TRN: US200306%%24
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Conference title not supplied, Conference location not supplied, Conference dates not supplied; Other Information: PBD: 1 Jun 2000
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; EARTHQUAKES; LANL; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; AMERICAN INDIANS; RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS; MATHEMATICAL MODELS

Citation Formats

A. L. CUNDY, and C. R. FARRAR. MODELING A NATIVE AMERICAN RUIN: DETERMINATION OF AN UPPER-BOUND EARTHQUAKE AT LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY. United States: N. p., 2000. Web.
A. L. CUNDY, & C. R. FARRAR. MODELING A NATIVE AMERICAN RUIN: DETERMINATION OF AN UPPER-BOUND EARTHQUAKE AT LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY. United States.
A. L. CUNDY, and C. R. FARRAR. Thu . "MODELING A NATIVE AMERICAN RUIN: DETERMINATION OF AN UPPER-BOUND EARTHQUAKE AT LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/785412.
@article{osti_785412,
title = {MODELING A NATIVE AMERICAN RUIN: DETERMINATION OF AN UPPER-BOUND EARTHQUAKE AT LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY},
author = {A. L. CUNDY and C. R. FARRAR},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2000},
month = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2000}
}

Conference:
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