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Title: DEVELOPMENT OF CO2 WAVEGUIDE LASERS AND LASER TECHNOLOGY FOR REMOTE SENSING

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
785358
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-01-4899
TRN: US0302084
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Conference title not supplied, Conference location not supplied, Conference dates not supplied; Other Information: PBD: 1 Aug 2001
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; LASERS; REMOTE SENSING; WAVEGUIDES; CARBON DIOXIDE LASERS

Citation Formats

G. E. BUSCH, C. J. HEWITT, and ET AL. DEVELOPMENT OF CO2 WAVEGUIDE LASERS AND LASER TECHNOLOGY FOR REMOTE SENSING. United States: N. p., 2001. Web.
G. E. BUSCH, C. J. HEWITT, & ET AL. DEVELOPMENT OF CO2 WAVEGUIDE LASERS AND LASER TECHNOLOGY FOR REMOTE SENSING. United States.
G. E. BUSCH, C. J. HEWITT, and ET AL. Wed . "DEVELOPMENT OF CO2 WAVEGUIDE LASERS AND LASER TECHNOLOGY FOR REMOTE SENSING". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/785358.
@article{osti_785358,
title = {DEVELOPMENT OF CO2 WAVEGUIDE LASERS AND LASER TECHNOLOGY FOR REMOTE SENSING},
author = {G. E. BUSCH and C. J. HEWITT and ET AL},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2001},
month = {Wed Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2001}
}

Conference:
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