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Title: POINT SET LABELING WITH SPECIFIED POSITIONS

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
784676
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-99-4101
TRN: US200306%%13
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Conference title not supplied, Conference location not supplied, Conference dates not supplied; Other Information: PBD: 1 Aug 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; MATHEMATICS; IDENTIFICATION SYSTEMS; INSTALLATION

Citation Formats

S. R. DODDI, M. V. MARATHE, and B. M. MORET. POINT SET LABELING WITH SPECIFIED POSITIONS. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
S. R. DODDI, M. V. MARATHE, & B. M. MORET. POINT SET LABELING WITH SPECIFIED POSITIONS. United States.
S. R. DODDI, M. V. MARATHE, and B. M. MORET. 1999. "POINT SET LABELING WITH SPECIFIED POSITIONS". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/784676.
@article{osti_784676,
title = {POINT SET LABELING WITH SPECIFIED POSITIONS},
author = {S. R. DODDI and M. V. MARATHE and B. M. MORET},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1999,
month = 8
}

Conference:
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