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Title: Corridor Length and Patch Colonization by a Butterfly Junonia coenia

Abstract

Habitat corridors have been proposed to reduce patch isolation and increase population persistence in fragmented landscapes. This study tested whether patch colonization was increased by the presence and various length corridors. The specific butterfly species tested has been shown to use corridors, however, the results indicate that neither the distance between patches or the presence of a corridor influenced colonization.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Savannah River Site (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
(US)
OSTI Identifier:
784139
Report Number(s):
00-6-P
TRN: AH200128%%368
DOE Contract Number:  
AI09-76SR00056
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Conservation Biology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 14; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: Submitted to Conservation Biology, Volume 14, Number 3; PBD: 1 Jun 2000
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; HABITAT; LEPIDOPTERA; POPULATION DYNAMICS; LAND RESOURCES; RESOURCE MANAGEMENT; LANDSCAPE MANAGEMENT; POPULATION VIABILITY

Citation Formats

Nick Haddad. Corridor Length and Patch Colonization by a Butterfly Junonia coenia. United States: N. p., 2000. Web.
Nick Haddad. Corridor Length and Patch Colonization by a Butterfly Junonia coenia. United States.
Nick Haddad. Thu . "Corridor Length and Patch Colonization by a Butterfly Junonia coenia". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/784139.
@article{osti_784139,
title = {Corridor Length and Patch Colonization by a Butterfly Junonia coenia},
author = {Nick Haddad},
abstractNote = {Habitat corridors have been proposed to reduce patch isolation and increase population persistence in fragmented landscapes. This study tested whether patch colonization was increased by the presence and various length corridors. The specific butterfly species tested has been shown to use corridors, however, the results indicate that neither the distance between patches or the presence of a corridor influenced colonization.},
doi = {},
journal = {Conservation Biology},
number = 3,
volume = 14,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {6}
}