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Title: THE APPLICATION OF FIXED AND RANDOM ERROR TO SHIPPER/RECEIVER DIFFERENCES

Abstract

In order to determine if a statistically significant difference exists between shipper and receiver measurements, a statistical combination of the shipper's and receiver's limit-of-error (LOE) is calculated to determine the shipper/receiver limit-of-error, LOES/R. The shipper's and receiver's LOE may possess random and systematic components. Depending on the interpretation of the systematic and random components, the determination of the LOES/R can be performed by several different calculational methods. These calculational methods and their associated underlying assumptions are reviewed in the context of the LANL shipper receiver program. This paper, by presenting the assumptions that form the basis of a site-specific shipper/receiver difference calculation, can assist those individuals responsible for calculating LOES/R.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
783349
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-01-3587
TRN: AH200129%%213
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Conference title not supplied, Conference location not supplied, Conference dates not supplied; Other Information: PBD: 1 Jun 2001
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
98 NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT, SAFEGUARDS, AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; LANL; SHIPPER-RECEIVER DIFFERENCES; ERRORS

Citation Formats

B. G. SCOTT. THE APPLICATION OF FIXED AND RANDOM ERROR TO SHIPPER/RECEIVER DIFFERENCES. United States: N. p., 2001. Web.
B. G. SCOTT. THE APPLICATION OF FIXED AND RANDOM ERROR TO SHIPPER/RECEIVER DIFFERENCES. United States.
B. G. SCOTT. Fri . "THE APPLICATION OF FIXED AND RANDOM ERROR TO SHIPPER/RECEIVER DIFFERENCES". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/783349.
@article{osti_783349,
title = {THE APPLICATION OF FIXED AND RANDOM ERROR TO SHIPPER/RECEIVER DIFFERENCES},
author = {B. G. SCOTT},
abstractNote = {In order to determine if a statistically significant difference exists between shipper and receiver measurements, a statistical combination of the shipper's and receiver's limit-of-error (LOE) is calculated to determine the shipper/receiver limit-of-error, LOES/R. The shipper's and receiver's LOE may possess random and systematic components. Depending on the interpretation of the systematic and random components, the determination of the LOES/R can be performed by several different calculational methods. These calculational methods and their associated underlying assumptions are reviewed in the context of the LANL shipper receiver program. This paper, by presenting the assumptions that form the basis of a site-specific shipper/receiver difference calculation, can assist those individuals responsible for calculating LOES/R.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2001},
month = {Fri Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2001}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • Every facility strives to comply with DOE Order 5630.2 requiring independent and timely measurements of between facility shipments. While it is desirable to resolve shipper-receiver (S/R) differences before processing any of the material, this is not always possible or practical. Two examples are discussed where there is an apparent measurement bias between the shipping and receiving facilities. This measurement bias persisted over several shipments resulting in more S/R differences outside the combined error limits than expected. For the first example, the receiver could not measure the material until processed. In the second example, the receiving facility made NDA measurements ofmore » the shipments before processing. While no definite answer exists that will resolve S/R differences in all situations, the examples presented of studies and investigations to identify biases and verify the integrity of the measurements could be applied at other facilities.« less
  • Every facility strives to comply with DOE order 5630.2 requiring independent and timely measurements between facility shipments. While it is desirable to resolve shipper-receiver (S/R) differences before processing any of the material, this is not always possible or practical. Two examples are discussed where there is an apparent measurement bias between the shipping and receiving facilities. This measurement bias persisted over several shipments resulting in more S/R differences outside the combined error limits than expected. For the first example, the receiver could not measure the material until processed. In the second example, the receiving facility made Nondestructive Analysis (NDA) measurementsmore » of the shipments before processing. However, shipments were closed by dissolution until a measurement problem with the dissolution required using the ND measurements for the next two shipments indicated the same size shipper-receiver difference. Individual items outside limits were identified and measured by an independent arbitrator. While no definite answer exists that will resolve shipper-receiver differences in all situations, the examples presented of studies and investigations to identify biases and verify the integrity of the measurements could be applied at other facilities. 2 figs., 1 tab.« less
  • Accurate quantitative Nondestructive Assay (NDA) of waste and scrap is difficult due to its heterogeneous nature. This becomes even more apparent when seeking measurement agreement of scrap measured on NDA equipment at different facilities calibrated with standards which have special nuclear material (SNM) placed in different configurations. Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) recently experienced a significant shipper/receiver difference with NDA measured combustible scrap sent to the Oak Ridge Y-12 facility. After extensive investigations, including remeasurement of a group of containers at both facilities (B and W and Y-12) using NDA systems and the recovery of the SNM by Y-12,more » it became apparent differences in the array of the SNM in the standards created a major part of the measurement problem. B and W has since developed a new set of standards with an SNM array that is different from previously used standards. Tests indicate that the use of the new standards created a calibration equation that provides sufficient agreement with the recovery values and the NDA measured values at Y-12. The use of these standards will reduce the shipper/receiver differences in the future. This paper describes the investigation and making of the new standards.« less
  • DOE Order 5633.3B requires measurement of Special Nuclear Material (SNM) upon shipment and receipt. These measurements are intended to provide assurance that no SNM has been removed during the transfer process. The receiver`s measurement also serves to establish an accountability value for the received SNM. Due to inherent uncertainty involved in the measurement and sampling of nuclear materials, some level of disagreement between shipper`s and receiver`s values is expected. Due to several factors, these differences may fall outside expected statistical bounds. Statistically significant shipper receiver differences, greater than 50 g of fissile material or 5 grams of tritium are requiredmore » to be investigated. This paper provides a review of Material Control and Accountability (MC and A) practices and procedures which will aid in the prevention of shipper/receiver differences, and facilitate successful investigation and closure in the event of a shipper/receiver difference.« less
  • Within the nuclear community, shipper-receiver differences generate considerable concern. Current methods of resolving these differences are discussed, prticularly the use of an umpire or referee. Numerous statistical problems connected with the present procedures are also considered.