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Title: A VISCOELASTIC MODEL FOR PBX BINDERS

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
783215
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-01-3492
TRN: AH200134%%219
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Conference title not supplied, Conference location not supplied, Conference dates not supplied; Other Information: PBD: 1 Jun 2001
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; BINDERS; CHEMICAL EXPLOSIVES; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; VISCOSITY; ELASTICITY

Citation Formats

E. M. MAS, and B. E. CLEMENTS. A VISCOELASTIC MODEL FOR PBX BINDERS. United States: N. p., 2001. Web.
E. M. MAS, & B. E. CLEMENTS. A VISCOELASTIC MODEL FOR PBX BINDERS. United States.
E. M. MAS, and B. E. CLEMENTS. Fri . "A VISCOELASTIC MODEL FOR PBX BINDERS". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/783215.
@article{osti_783215,
title = {A VISCOELASTIC MODEL FOR PBX BINDERS},
author = {E. M. MAS and B. E. CLEMENTS},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2001},
month = {Fri Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2001}
}

Conference:
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