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Title: Oak Ridge Reservation Public Warning Siren System Annual Test Report

Abstract

The full operational test of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Public Warning Siren System (PWSS) was successfully conducted on September 27, 2000. The annual test is a full-scale sounding of the individual siren systems around each of the three Department of Energy (DOE) sites in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The purpose of the annual test is to demonstrate and validate the siren systems' ability to alert personnel outdoors in the Immediate Notification Zones (INZ) (approximately two miles) around each site. The success of this test is based on two critical functions of the siren system. The first function is system operability. The system is considered operable if 90% of the sirens are operational. System diagnostics and direct field observations were used to validate the operability of the siren systems. Based on the diagnostic results and field observations, greater than 90% of the sirens were considered operational. The second function is system audibility. The system is considered audible if the siren could be heard in the immediate notification zones around each of the three sites. Direct field observations, along with sound level measurements, were used to validate the audibility of the siren system. Based on the direct field observations and sound levelmore » measurements, the siren system was considered audible. The combination of field observations, system diagnostic status reports, and sound level measurements provided a high level of confidence that the system met and would meet operational requirements upon demand. As part of the overall system test, the Tennessee Emergency Management Agency (TEMA) activated the Emergency Alerting System (EAS), which utilized area radio stations to make announcements regarding the test and to remind residents of what to do in the event of an actual emergency.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Defense Programs (DP) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
782768
Report Number(s):
EMPO-561 Rev.0
TRN: US0103496
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-84OR21400
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1 Oct 2000
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; OAK RIDGE RESERVATION; ALARM SYSTEMS; PERFORMANCE TESTING; EMERGENCY PLANS; PUBLIC ANXIETY; PUBLIC HEALTH; SAFETY

Citation Formats

R. F. Gee. Oak Ridge Reservation Public Warning Siren System Annual Test Report. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.2172/782768.
R. F. Gee. Oak Ridge Reservation Public Warning Siren System Annual Test Report. United States. doi:10.2172/782768.
R. F. Gee. Sun . "Oak Ridge Reservation Public Warning Siren System Annual Test Report". United States. doi:10.2172/782768. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/782768.
@article{osti_782768,
title = {Oak Ridge Reservation Public Warning Siren System Annual Test Report},
author = {R. F. Gee},
abstractNote = {The full operational test of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Public Warning Siren System (PWSS) was successfully conducted on September 27, 2000. The annual test is a full-scale sounding of the individual siren systems around each of the three Department of Energy (DOE) sites in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The purpose of the annual test is to demonstrate and validate the siren systems' ability to alert personnel outdoors in the Immediate Notification Zones (INZ) (approximately two miles) around each site. The success of this test is based on two critical functions of the siren system. The first function is system operability. The system is considered operable if 90% of the sirens are operational. System diagnostics and direct field observations were used to validate the operability of the siren systems. Based on the diagnostic results and field observations, greater than 90% of the sirens were considered operational. The second function is system audibility. The system is considered audible if the siren could be heard in the immediate notification zones around each of the three sites. Direct field observations, along with sound level measurements, were used to validate the audibility of the siren system. Based on the direct field observations and sound level measurements, the siren system was considered audible. The combination of field observations, system diagnostic status reports, and sound level measurements provided a high level of confidence that the system met and would meet operational requirements upon demand. As part of the overall system test, the Tennessee Emergency Management Agency (TEMA) activated the Emergency Alerting System (EAS), which utilized area radio stations to make announcements regarding the test and to remind residents of what to do in the event of an actual emergency.},
doi = {10.2172/782768},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {10}
}