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Title: 3T3 cell motility and morphology before, during, and after exposure to extremely-low-frequency magnetic fields

Abstract

Automated image cytometry techniques were used to measure motility and morphology in 3T3 fibro-blasts exposed to extremely-low-frequency (ELF) magnetic fields. Cell motility and morphology were measured as a function of time before, during, and after 3--4 hour exposures to vertically oriented, 100 {mu}T{sub RMS} sinusoidal magnetic fields at various frequencies in the 10--63 Hz range. Sham exposures were also carried out. No static DC fields were applied, but the geomagnetic field was almost vertical and, therefore, had a large component (28.3 {mu}T) parallel to the applied AC field. The morphology and motile behavior of the cells were characterized by mathematically defined descriptors, which were calculated and averaged for the exposure period as well as for control periods that preceded and followed the exposure period. Each experiment involved the tracking of 100 cells that were subjected to one of the test frequencies (unless a sham exposure was being conducted). Statistical analysis of the results showed that even small changes of 10--20% could be significant at the P < .05 level. Changes on this order were measured in a significant proportion of the experiments. However, because such results were seen for both the sham-exposed and the ELF-exposed cells, and because the rangemore » of values that was obtained for the sham exposures was the same as that obtained for the ELF exposures, the authors concluded that there was no evidence to show that any of the measured changes were attributable to the applied ELF magnetic field.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. British Columbia Cancer Research Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada). Cancer Imaging
  2. Ontario Hydro, Whitby, Ontario (Canada). Health and Safety Div.
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
78094
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Bioelectromagnetics; Journal Volume: 16; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: PBD: 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; FIBROBLASTS; SENSITIVITY; MORPHOLOGICAL CHANGES; CYTOLOGICAL TECHNIQUES; MATHEMATICAL MODELS

Citation Formats

Spadinger, I., Palcic, B., and Agnew, D. 3T3 cell motility and morphology before, during, and after exposure to extremely-low-frequency magnetic fields. United States: N. p., 1995. Web. doi:10.1002/bem.2250160306.
Spadinger, I., Palcic, B., & Agnew, D. 3T3 cell motility and morphology before, during, and after exposure to extremely-low-frequency magnetic fields. United States. doi:10.1002/bem.2250160306.
Spadinger, I., Palcic, B., and Agnew, D. 1995. "3T3 cell motility and morphology before, during, and after exposure to extremely-low-frequency magnetic fields". United States. doi:10.1002/bem.2250160306.
@article{osti_78094,
title = {3T3 cell motility and morphology before, during, and after exposure to extremely-low-frequency magnetic fields},
author = {Spadinger, I. and Palcic, B. and Agnew, D.},
abstractNote = {Automated image cytometry techniques were used to measure motility and morphology in 3T3 fibro-blasts exposed to extremely-low-frequency (ELF) magnetic fields. Cell motility and morphology were measured as a function of time before, during, and after 3--4 hour exposures to vertically oriented, 100 {mu}T{sub RMS} sinusoidal magnetic fields at various frequencies in the 10--63 Hz range. Sham exposures were also carried out. No static DC fields were applied, but the geomagnetic field was almost vertical and, therefore, had a large component (28.3 {mu}T) parallel to the applied AC field. The morphology and motile behavior of the cells were characterized by mathematically defined descriptors, which were calculated and averaged for the exposure period as well as for control periods that preceded and followed the exposure period. Each experiment involved the tracking of 100 cells that were subjected to one of the test frequencies (unless a sham exposure was being conducted). Statistical analysis of the results showed that even small changes of 10--20% could be significant at the P < .05 level. Changes on this order were measured in a significant proportion of the experiments. However, because such results were seen for both the sham-exposed and the ELF-exposed cells, and because the range of values that was obtained for the sham exposures was the same as that obtained for the ELF exposures, the authors concluded that there was no evidence to show that any of the measured changes were attributable to the applied ELF magnetic field.},
doi = {10.1002/bem.2250160306},
journal = {Bioelectromagnetics},
number = 3,
volume = 16,
place = {United States},
year = 1995,
month = 8
}
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