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Title: Chronic Dermal Toxicity of Epoxy Resins I. Skin Carcinogenic Potency and General Toxicity

Abstract

Epoxy resins are a diverse class of chemicals that differ in structure, physical properties, and, presumably, biological activity. The purpose of these experiments was to compare the chronic dermal toxicity and carcinogenicity of selected commercial epoxy resins and to determine the potential for positive synergistic carcinogenic interactions between different resins. This work is an extension and continuation of a Department of Energy sponsored program to evaluate epoxy resins for potential occupational health risks. The materials examined were chosen on the basis of their interest to the U.S. government. They are representative of the manufacturer's production at the time, and therefore the data are completely valid only for the specific production period. Results of the experimental exposures will be reported in two parts. This report describes the test materials, their chemical and physical characteristics and the experimental design. General (systemic) toxicity will be evaluated and the skin carcinogenicity of the materials compared. A subsequent report will provide morphological descriptions of skin and significant internal pathology induced by the various treatments.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
777676
Report Number(s):
ORNL-5762
TRN: AH200118%%120
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-96OR22464
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 16 Jan 2001
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; DESIGN; PATHOLOGY; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; PRODUCTION; RESINS; TOXICITY; CARCINOGENESIS

Citation Formats

Holland, J.M. Chronic Dermal Toxicity of Epoxy Resins I. Skin Carcinogenic Potency and General Toxicity. United States: N. p., 2001. Web. doi:10.2172/777676.
Holland, J.M. Chronic Dermal Toxicity of Epoxy Resins I. Skin Carcinogenic Potency and General Toxicity. United States. doi:10.2172/777676.
Holland, J.M. Tue . "Chronic Dermal Toxicity of Epoxy Resins I. Skin Carcinogenic Potency and General Toxicity". United States. doi:10.2172/777676. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/777676.
@article{osti_777676,
title = {Chronic Dermal Toxicity of Epoxy Resins I. Skin Carcinogenic Potency and General Toxicity},
author = {Holland, J.M.},
abstractNote = {Epoxy resins are a diverse class of chemicals that differ in structure, physical properties, and, presumably, biological activity. The purpose of these experiments was to compare the chronic dermal toxicity and carcinogenicity of selected commercial epoxy resins and to determine the potential for positive synergistic carcinogenic interactions between different resins. This work is an extension and continuation of a Department of Energy sponsored program to evaluate epoxy resins for potential occupational health risks. The materials examined were chosen on the basis of their interest to the U.S. government. They are representative of the manufacturer's production at the time, and therefore the data are completely valid only for the specific production period. Results of the experimental exposures will be reported in two parts. This report describes the test materials, their chemical and physical characteristics and the experimental design. General (systemic) toxicity will be evaluated and the skin carcinogenicity of the materials compared. A subsequent report will provide morphological descriptions of skin and significant internal pathology induced by the various treatments.},
doi = {10.2172/777676},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 16 00:00:00 EST 2001},
month = {Tue Jan 16 00:00:00 EST 2001}
}

Technical Report:

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  • This report quantifies the cutaneous and systemic response of male and female C3H mice to skin application of selected commercial epoxy resins and amine curing agents, at the maximum tolerated dermal dose (MTDD). Resins tested were: diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) (CAS no. 1675-54-3); mixtures of the same resins with bis(2,3-epoxycyclopentyl) ether (CAS no. 2386-90-5; diglycidyl ether of resorcinol (CAS no. 101-90-6); N,N'-diglycidyl-5,5-dimethylhydantoin (CAS no. 15336-81-9); diglycidyl ether of neopentyl glycol (CAS no. 17557-23-2); A 70:30 mixture of the hydantoin and neopentyl glycol base resins; the amine curing agent menthane diamine (CAS no. 80-52-4); and a dutectic mixture ofmore » meta-phenylenediamine (CAS no. 108-45-2) and DGEBA. A DGEBA manufactured by Union Carbide Corporation (Material E, Appendix A) in the mid-1970's and assayed for skin carcinogenicity previously was chemically characterized. The results of this analysis are included with the present data for comparison purposes. Background information on the special statistical methods used is presented in Appendix C. (PSB)« less
  • The Carcinogenic Potency Database (CPDB) is an easily accessible, standardized resource of positive and negative long-term animal cancer tests. The CPDB has been published in four earlier papers that include results for approximately 4000 experiments on 1050 chemicals. This paper describes the CPDB: goals, inclusion criteria, fields of information, and published plot format. It also present an overview of our published papers using the CPDB. The CPDB as published in plot format readily permits comparisons of carcinogenic potency and many other aspects of cancer tests, including for each experiment the species and strain of tests animal, the route and durationmore » of compound administration, dose level and other aspects of experimental protocol, histopathology and tumor incidence, TD[sub 50] (carcinogenic potency) and its statistical significance, dose response, author's opinion about carcinogenicity, and literature citation. A combined plot of all result from the four separate papers, which is ordered alphabetically by chemical, is available from L.S. Gold, in printed form or on computer tape or diskette. A computer readable (SAS) database is also available. The overview of papers includes descriptions of work on methods of estimating carcinogenic potency, reproducibility of results in near-replicate cancer tests, correlation in potency between species, ranking possible carcinogenic hazards, comparison of positivity and target organ in rats and mice, comparison of mutagens and nonmutagens, proportion of chemicals positive in animal tests, natural compared to synthetic chemicals, and mechanistic issues in interspecies extrapolations. 30 refs., 1 fig.« less
  • The objective of this study was to determine the dosage levels to be employed in a 13-week toxicity study in rats. A maximum tolerated dose was not achieved in the conduct of this study. Dermal irritation at the site of application and a decreased body weight gain attributed to the application of the test article, First Stage Middle Distillate (SRC) were both observed at the low dosage level, 312 mg/kg/day. Compound related observations which were noted at higher dosage levels included dermal irritation, decreased body weight gain, compound related pharmacotoxic signs, and mortality. Test article related macroscopic changes consisting ofmore » erythema, thickening, coriaceousness, and ulcerations were observed at the application site of all dosage groups exposed to First Stage Middle Distillate (SRC) for 4 weeks. Neither systemic changes nor changes indicative of a manner of death were observed. The objective of this study was not achieved as a maximum tolerated dose was not obtained, however, an additional 2-week dose-range finding study in rats has been scheduled to augment the findings of this study. A further similar test to the above is described. Similarly, two range finding dermal teratology studies with middle distillate are described. The 1000 and 2000 mg/kg/day treatment groups displayed marked increases in the mean number of postimplantation losses and corresponding decreases in the number of viable fetuses compared to values for the control group. (LTN)« less
  • We have completed an extensive program to investigate the toxicity---including mutagenic, carcinogenic, and teratogenic potential---of SRC-I (Solvent Refined Coal-I) products, along with selected intermediates and waste materials, as represented by the SRC-I Design Baseline. The original primary objective of the toxicology program was to produce data that could be used for four main purposes: to support design of programs to ensure workers' health and safety; to help estimate environmental impacts of SRC-I technology; to support the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) premanufacturing notification process for SRC-I technology; and to promote public understanding and acceptance of the potential health effects ofmore » the emerging synfuels industry. The toxicology program consists of five main elements: (1) Genetic Toxicity Evaluations; (2) Acute Animal Toxicity Evaluations; (3) Subchronic Animal Toxicity Evaluations; (4) Chronic (life-span) Animal Carcinogenicity Evaluation; (5) Quality Control/Quality Assurance (QC/QA) Monitoring and Evaluation.« less
  • We have completed an extensive program to investigate the toxicity---including mutagenic,, carcinogenic, and teratogenic potential---of SRC-I (Solvent Refined Coal-I) products, along with selected intermediates and waste materials, as represented by the SRC-I Design Baseline. The original primary objective of the toxicology program was to produce data that could be used for four main purposes: to support design of programs to ensure workers' health and safety; to help estimate environmental impacts of SRC-I technology; to support the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) premanufacturing notification process for SRC-I technology; and to promote public understanding and acceptance of the potential health effects ofmore » the emerging synfuels industry. The toxicology program consists of five main elements: (1) Genetic Toxicity Evaluations; (2) Acute Animal Toxicity Evaluations; (3) Subchronic Animal Toxicity Evaluations; (4) Chronic (life-span) Animal Carcinogenicity Evaluation; (5) Quality Control/Quality Assurance (QC/QA) Monitoring and Evaluation.« less