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Title: Projecting Fatalities in Crashes Involving Older Drivers, 2000-2025

Abstract

As part of this research effort, we developed a new methodology for projecting elderly traffic crash fatalities. This methodology separates exposure to crashes from crash risk per se, and further divides exposure into two components, the number of miles driven and the likelihood of being a driver. This component structure permits conceptually different determinants of traffic fatalities to be projected separately and has thorough motivation in behavioral theory. It also permits finer targeting of particular aspects of projections that need improvement and closer linking of projections to possible policy instruments for influencing them.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
CRADA WITH GENERAL MOTORS, CRADA NO. ORNL 98-0500 (US)
OSTI Identifier:
777650
Report Number(s):
ORNL-6963
TRN: AH200118%%34
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-96OR22464
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 23 Mar 2001
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; VEHICLES; ACCIDENTS; ELDERLY PEOPLE; DEATH; FORECASTING

Citation Formats

Hu, P.S.. Projecting Fatalities in Crashes Involving Older Drivers, 2000-2025. United States: N. p., 2001. Web. doi:10.2172/777650.
Hu, P.S.. Projecting Fatalities in Crashes Involving Older Drivers, 2000-2025. United States. doi:10.2172/777650.
Hu, P.S.. 2001. "Projecting Fatalities in Crashes Involving Older Drivers, 2000-2025". United States. doi:10.2172/777650. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/777650.
@article{osti_777650,
title = {Projecting Fatalities in Crashes Involving Older Drivers, 2000-2025},
author = {Hu, P.S.},
abstractNote = {As part of this research effort, we developed a new methodology for projecting elderly traffic crash fatalities. This methodology separates exposure to crashes from crash risk per se, and further divides exposure into two components, the number of miles driven and the likelihood of being a driver. This component structure permits conceptually different determinants of traffic fatalities to be projected separately and has thorough motivation in behavioral theory. It also permits finer targeting of particular aspects of projections that need improvement and closer linking of projections to possible policy instruments for influencing them.},
doi = {10.2172/777650},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2001,
month = 3
}

Technical Report:

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